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Officials celebrate completion of Hatchery Creek Officials celebrate completion of Hatchery Creek
JAMESTOWN, Ky. (April 29, 2016) – Officials celebrated the completion of the Hatchery Creek Restoration Project below Wolf Creek Dam during a dedication ceremony...
Chickamauga Lock Replacement Project work restarts Chickamauga Lock Replacement Project work restarts
CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (April 25, 2016) – The Chickamauga Lock Replacement Project restarted today with official fanfare as a $3.1 million cofferdam stabilization...
Corps evaluates STEM competition at Tennessee State University Corps evaluates STEM competition at Tennessee State...
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (April 7, 2016) – A group of technical experts from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District judged a Science, Technology, Engineering...
Stello named Nashville District February 2016 employee of the month Stello named Nashville District February 2016 employee...
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (April 8, 2016) – Steve Stello, civil hydraulic engineer in the water resources section of the hydraulics and hydrology branch, is the U.S. Army...
Dynamic duo receives Nashville District’s Hedgehog Award Dynamic duo receives Nashville District’s Hedgehog Award
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (April 8, 2016) – A dynamic duo received the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District’s Hedgehog Award today in recognition of work that...
Jackson gets general overview of Nashville District construction projects Jackson gets general overview of Nashville District...
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (March 31, 2016) – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers deputy commanding general for Civil and Emergency Operations visited a Nashville District...


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Officials celebrate completion of Hatchery Creek Officials celebrate completion of Hatchery Creek
David Brown of Crestwood, Ky., catches a trout in Hatchery Creek in Jamestown, Ky., April 29, 2016. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District officials...
Chickamauga Lock Replacement Project work restarts Chickamauga Lock Replacement Project work restarts
Congressman Chuck Fleischmann, Tennessee District 3, addresses the media about the cofferdam stabilization project and the restart of work on the new Chickamauga Lock...
Dynamic duo receives Nashville District’s Hedgehog Award Dynamic duo receives Nashville District’s Hedgehog Award
Lt. Col. Stephen Murphy, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District commander, presents the Hedgehog Award to Kathryn Firsching (Right), assistant district...
Stello named Nashville District February 2016 employee of the month Stello named Nashville District February 2016 employee...
Steve Stello, civil hydraulic engineer in Nashville District Hydraulics and Hydrology Branch, is the February 2016 employee of the month for the development and...
Corps evaluates STEM competition at Tennessee State University Corps evaluates STEM competition at Tennessee State...
David Claussen and Stephanie Coleman, both Equal Employment Office specialists with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers talk with Dr. Lauren Ricky from the Johnson...
Corps general discusses dam safety issues at Old Hickory Dam with Nashville leaders Corps general discusses dam safety issues at Old Hickory...
Brig. Gen. Richard G. Kaiser, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Great Lakes and Ohio River Division commanding general in Cincinnati, makes a statement during a media...


Recent Video

Construction restarts on Chickamauga Lock Replacement Project Construction restarts on Chickamauga Lock Replacement...
Work resumed on the Chickamauga Lock Replacement Project April 25, 2016 with official fanfare as a $3.1 million cofferdam stabilization project got underway....
Alcohol and water do not mix Alcohol and water do not mix
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers wants to remind the public that drinking alcohol and operating a boat on the water doesn’t mix. It’s illegal and greatly...
Borrow a Life Jacket to Stay Safe Borrow a Life Jacket to Stay Safe
The public is asked to please remember to return life jackets borrowed from a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers loaner board. This public service announcement is in...
Don’t Burn Trash When You Camp Don’t Burn Trash When You Camp
The U.S. Corps of Engineers caution campers of the dangers of burning trash when visiting a Corps campground. Media and members of the public are encouraged to use...
Don't risk it cliff jumping Don't risk it cliff jumping
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reminds the public that unknown conditions lay under the water, so the thrill of jumping may not be worth it. This public service...
Equip Your Boat to Stay Safe Equip Your Boat to Stay Safe
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers park rangers encourage boaters to ensure their vessels are fully equipped with all the required safety equipment before heading out on a...



Officials celebrate completion of Hatchery Creek


Story by Leon Roberts

Officials celebrate completion of Hatchery Creek JAMESTOWN, Ky. (April 29, 2016) – Officials celebrated the completion of the Hatchery Creek Restoration Project below Wolf Creek Dam during a dedication ceremony today, culminating a 21-month stream and wetland mitigation project that triples the length of the stream and prevents sedimentation pollution from making its way into the Cumberland River.

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources conceived the project decades ago, but really came to fruition in the last seven years. Funding totaling $1.8 million, not including Corps funding for excavation, for the mitigation project on Corps of Engineers property came from monies held in a trust for stream and wetland restoration from the Kentucky Wetland and Stream Mitigation Fund.

Lt. Col. Stephen Murphy, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District commander, said the project is “unique” because of the partnership building between the state of Kentucky and federal agencies, and because it primarily offsets the impact of construction projects by reestablishing and enhancing about five and a half acres of valuable streams and wetlands.

“It also solved for us a massive erosion problem that was threatening several of our campsites and roadways at Kendall Campground,” Murphy said. “That was costing the Corps of Engineers almost $50,000 working on that. The completion of this project has completely solved that problem.”

The project gave the Corps of Engineers enough top soil to cover a 40-acre disposal area filled with limestone rock, concrete and clay from the Wolf Creek Dam Safety Rehabilitation Project. The Corps spent $650,000 to excavate the soil, the solution that provided the most cost savings.

“It was a win-win solution for the Corps as well as with the other agencies because we were able to use about 56,000 cubic yards of top soil excavated from the channel and it saved us almost a million dollars,” Murphy said.

Hatchery Creek now extends from the Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery more than a mile through woodlands and wetlands with man-made runs, glides, pools, eddies, shoals and hunker bunkers cut up under its banks to mimic natural, wild streams and encourage natural behavior and spawning of wild trout.

Gregory K. Johnson, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources commissioner, said a year ago this scenic stream did not exist and the flow of water from the fish hatchery took a much shorter route to the Cumberland River through a deep and eroded gulley.

“That gulley damaged water quality in the river,” Johnson said. “There was a sediment plume at the end of that ditch down there in the river. You could see it from aerial photography… it threatened downstream fisheries. It created serious public safety issues, really had no habitat value and frankly was an eye sore.”

Now more than 18 million gallons of water flow into the new stream from the fish hatchery daily. The stream drops 47 feet in elevation, including 30 feet through a series of steep pools in the final 150 yards before it empties into the Cumberland River.

The project required collaboration between biologists and engineers, contractors, volunteers and others to ensure success, Johnson said.

Kentucky State Senator Max Wise, District 16, added that the success of the project and getting things done did involve relationships, teamwork and determination, and the dedication of Hatchery Creek is a testament to the hard work by multiple agencies.

“The original visionaries of this project turned to others to be able to convert dreams into realities,” Wise said. “This development invigorates the entire natural area. It perfectly accents this area’s other many attractions that we have – that being the State Resort Park, Lure Lodge, Wolf Creek Dam, which is a major Kentucky lake tourist lure, and of course the Cumberland River. It’s a tremendous addition.”

James Gray, Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery manager, manages the stocking trout in streams across the state of Kentucky. He said Hatchery Creek is really the culmination of decades of talking about it, identifying funding solutions, and then agencies and private contractors partnering and working through the technical obstacles to make the stream a reality.

“This is a one-of-a-kind project and I think it’s going to be a precedent for other projects around the country,” Gray said. “The economic impact that it is going to have to Russell County and this area I think is going to be tremendous.”

Agencies involved in the Hatchery Creek Restoration Project included the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, Kentucky Division of Water, Kentucky Department of Environmental Protection, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Ecogro, RidgeWater Restoration and Management, and Stantec made up the project team of contractors.

(For more news, updates and information please follow the Nashville District on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/nashvillecorps and Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/nashvillecorps.)

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Officials celebrate completion of Hatchery Creek