Maintenance window scheduled to begin at February 14th 2200 est. until 0400 est. February 15th

(e.g. yourname@email.com)

Forgot Password?

    Defense Visual Information Distribution Service Logo

    LOCAL STUDENTS BROADEN PERSPECTIVE AT COURTNEY SUMMER ENGLISH CLASS /コートニー夏期英語クラスで見聞広める地元学生

    LOCAL STUDENTS BROADEN PERSPECTIVE AT COURTNEY SUMMER ENGLISH CLASS /コートニー夏期英語クラスで見聞広める地元学生

    Photo By Yoshie Makiyama | Participating students, age 15 to 20, from Uruma City pose for a photo on August 14,...... read more read more

    OKINAWA, JAPAN

    01.22.2024

    Story by Yoshie Makiyama 

    Marine Corps Installations Pacific

    Camp Courtney opened its gates to local students from the neighboring city of Uruma to give them an opportunity to experience American culture during a five-day Camp Courtney Summer English Class, August 14-18, 2023. With it, students had a chance not just to learn English but also broaden their understanding of their own surroundings and Japanese culture. The project has continued for more than 20 years, and Uruma City now supports publicity and transportation.

    Background

    Okinawa is known to the Japanese for hosting many U.S. military bases, and Uruma City is one of the areas that shares land with the U.S. Marine Corps.

    Although military bases and neighboring communities are separated by a fence, a lot of communities take advantage of this unique environment. Military service members often lend their support to local residents by participating in cleanups. However, one of the ever-popular exchanges between communities is English classes.

    When Ichiro Umehara, the community relations specialist for Camps Courtney and McTureous, received a local parent’s request over 20 years ago for students to study English on base as if they were abroad, he recognized the benefits and came up with the idea of a 5-day English class during summer vacation for Japanese school children. Umehara thought this could bring the base and the local community closer together.

    Umehara initiated the Camp Courtney Summer English Class in the summer of 2000. His initial goal was for local children to enjoy learning English and experience American culture just a fence away from their community. However, his deeper thought was that the experience of the English class would go beyond just speaking English but connect to their awareness of their surroundings and future jobs.

    “I was born in the south of Okinawa where there are no military bases around, so I didn’t have much opportunity to be exposed to English,” said Mika Nago, the mother of a participating student. “This kind of learning opportunity will be an advantage and an inspiration for them. It doesn’t have to be all about learning English. Just by being in contact with other people, we can share our different cultures and values.”

    2023 Summer English Class

    In 2023, Uruma City welcomed the applicants, not just high schoolers but also college and vocational school students ― to make up for missed opportunities due to the COVID-19 pandemic ― through their newsletter and homepage. A total of 30 students, first-come and first-serve, from Uruma City, age 15 to 20, participated.

    "I want the students to change from this experience,” said Yoshinori Shinzato, the director of the Uruma City Citizen Collaboration Policy Division of the Residential Affairs Department.

    Uruma City shares the land with not just the U.S. Marine Corps, but also the Navy, Army, and the sea area with the Air Force. On top of that, there are various Japanese Self-Defense Forces bases, including the Ground Self-Defense Force and Maritime Self-Defense Force.

    "If we can make use of what we already have and help the children learn, I think it is worthwhile," said Shinzato. "It is necessary to understand the nature of the bases, so it is important to know why they exist, and to see and hear what they will say.”

    The program included classroom sessions, tours of on-base facilities, and one unique tour which changes every year with Umehara’s choice. Every course was to enlighten the students on the differences between Japanese and American culture and lifestyle. Five to 10 Marines were invited and assigned to groups of students. Since not all the students understood English, there were local college students who supported the participants with English translation.

    The summer English class started out with an introduction and moved to discussion among participants in English. The given topic for discussion changed every session to ensure diverse conversations. They also rotated the groups or tables once a subject was done, and mixed the groups daily.

    “It was really nice because we started to walk around and go to different groups,” said Lance Cpl. Trey C. Girard, Headquarters Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, on his third day of the class. “We can teach all the groups different things, not just our first group, which is really cool.” However, he also noticed that although some of the students started to open up a little more, some were still shy. Girard said that he tried to talk to them since he understood how they felt, as he used to be shy at one point in his life.

    One of the topics included an explanation of Okinawan food. It seems simple; however, Umehara wanted students to use their full knowledge of the subject matter and explain it from many aspects, such as how to make the food, the ingredients, and nutritional benefits as well, even if they lacked English skills.

    After the English exchange, Umehara scheduled lunch at various locations on Camp Courtney. He wanted the students to experience the different types of eating environments, such as Tengan Castle for the dining style restaurant, Bulldogs as the fast-food restaurant, and the mess hall where normally only service members were allowed to eat. Each afternoon, the group ventured out for a field trip to camp facilities such as the library, gym, commissary (grocery store), exchange store (retail store) and barracks (dorms).

    “I was able to experience what kind of rooms Americans live in and what kind of food they usually eat, so I felt a little closer to them as if we are the same people,” said Miriya Nakamura, a high school sophomore.
    The class did not miss adding in some fun. Even though it was midday on a weekday, Umehara requested the Bowling alley to turn on the party lights for the participants to experience the atmosphere of an American bowling alley on a weekend night.

    A field trip to Camp Schwab and Henoko District of Nago City

    The fourth day was a day trip to Camp Schwab and Henoko District office in Nago City. The participants learned the purpose behind Camp Schwab and what they do operationally from the camp director and community relations specialist. They also gained insight into the relationships between the district residents and service members from the perspective of Shigeru Shimabukuro, Henoko District mayor.

    At the meeting on Camp Schwab, participants asked two Marines about their thoughts on the protestors outside the gate and Henoko landfill, which has been ongoing since 2018, when the land reclamation work began on the Henoko coast in preparation for the relocation of Marine Corps Air Station Futenma to Henoko.

    One Marine replied that he has never had a negative experience from people outside the gate nor local residents, saying “what we think is nice is different from what people here think is nice. Sometimes it's a misunderstanding and something you have to work on.” Another Marine said he was unaware of the Henoko relocation and thought the landfill was just a landfill, which surprised many participants.

    Shimabukuro also took questions from participants. He shared a few of his memories of the past and explained to the students how the residents of the district have dealt with the situations with Camp Schwab for 65 years since its establishment.

    “There are so many people who misunderstand our situations,” said Shimabukuro. “Our residents have good relationships with the service members. They (Camp Schwab and its Marines) are a part of our district and even have the 11th section flag, and participate in our community events and activities. Our mentality is that we are all friends.”

    Karin Kinjo, a sophomore from a local high school, commented that she has never given a thought to the reason about the landfill or why the U.S. military bases existed in Okinawa because they were always there since she was born.

    “It was difficult for me,” said Kinjo. “I had seen many opinions against the landfill on TV, so I agreed with them, but after listening to the people inside the base, I realized that there are many different opinions. It is important to listen to other opinions, not just one.”

    After summer English class

    Anna Nagayama, a freshman at Okinawa University, said she was under the impression that it was fine as long as she could speak English when she first came to the summer English class, but realized it would be better to understand the culture of the country and the problems faced by people from abroad as well.

    According to her, even though she lived in Okinawa all her life, there were so many things she was not aware of. “I need to learn more about the language, culture, and Okinawa, where I live, in order to deepen our exchange,” said Nagayama.

    Yuna Azama from the Uruma City Citizen Collaboration Policy Division, who accompanied the students throughout the summer English class, was amazed how honest students were, and she had a good feeling about their possibilities. "Being exposed to a different culture was a shocking experience to some students; however, it also gave them a chance to realize that there are choices in their future by knowing different ways of thinking and seeing," said Azama.

    The 5-day-long summer English class ended with a friendship barbecue cook-out. Marine volunteers worked together to serve food, and at the same time interact with students in sports outside the facility.

     キャンプ・コートニーが、2023年8月14日から18日までの5日間、近隣のうるま市から地元の学生を迎え、アメリカ文化を体験し、英語を学ぶだけでなく、 自分たちを取り巻く環境や自国の日本文化をも理解するきっかけとなるキャンプ・コートニー・サマー・イングリッシュ・クラスを開催した。この企画は20年以上にわたって続けられており、現在はうるま市が広報や送迎をサポートしている。

     背景

     沖縄は多くの米軍基地を抱える地域として日本人に知られており、うるま市は米海兵隊と土地を共有しているそのような地域のひとつである。

     軍事基地と近隣地域はフェンスで隔てられているが、多くの地区がその独特な環境を利用。軍人はしばしば地域の清掃活動に参加し、地域住民を支援する。しかし、地域間の交流で常に人気があるのは、英語教室だ。

      20年以上前、 キャンプ・コートニー&マクトリアスの梅原一郎渉外官は、地元の保護者から、「基地が近いので、海外にいるような感覚で英語を学べる機会がほしい」という要望を受けたとき、地域の高校生を対象に、夏休みを利用した5日間の夏期英語クラスを思いついた。これなら、基地と地域社会との距離を縮めることができると考えたのだ。

     2000年の夏にクラスは始動。渉外官の当初の目的は、地元の生徒が楽しみながら英語を学び、フェンス一枚隔てただけのアメリカ文化を体験することだった。しかし、彼の深い思いは、夏期英語クラスでの体験が単に英語を話すだけはでなく、自分たちを取り巻く環境や将来の仕事への意識にもつながっていくことだった。

     参加者の父母、名護美香さんは、「私は軍事基地のない南部に生まれたので、英語に触れる機会があまりありませんでした。このような学習機会は、彼らにとってのプラスであり、刺激になるでしょう。英語を学ぶことがすべてではありません。他の人々と触れ合うだけで、異なる文化や価値観を共有することができます」と話す。

     夏期英語クラス 2023

      2023年、うるま市は、広報誌等を通じてコロナ禍で逃した機会を取り戻そうと、高校生だけでなく大学生や専門学校生も応募者の対象にした。参加したのは、うるま市在住の15歳から20歳までの先着順の学生計30人。

     うるま市市民生活部の新里禎規部長は、参加者を見て「化けてほしい、いい意味で」と話す。

     うるま市は米海兵隊だけでなく、海軍、陸軍、海域は空軍と土地を共有している。その上、陸上自衛隊や海上自衛隊など様々な自衛隊の基地がある。

     「あるものを利かして、子どもたちの勉強になればよいのでは」と新里氏は言い、「基地のあり方を理解しないといけません。なぜ基地が存在するのかも含め、その懐に飛び込んで見聞きすることは良いアイデアです」と語った。

     夏期英語クラスには、室内での英語レッスンのほか、基地内施設の見学、そして渉外官の機転で毎年変わるユニークなツアーが含まれている。どのコースも、日米の文化や生活習慣の違いについて生徒たちを啓発するものだ。5人から10人の海兵隊員がボランティアとして参加し、生徒らのグループに割り当てられた。参加者全員が英語を理解できるわけではないため、彼らを英語でサポートする地元大学生も待機。

     クラスは自己紹介から始まり、参加者同士の英語でのやり取りに移った。多様な会話ができるように、与えられたテーマはセッションごとに変更され、1つのテーマが終わるとグループやテーブルを移動、毎日グループのメンバーも変えられた。

     キャンプ3日目に、第3海兵師団司令部大隊のトレイ・C・ジラード上等兵は、「歩き回って、いろいろなグループに移動したので、本当によかった。最初のグループだけでなく、すべてのグループにいろいろなことを教えることができました」と語った。しかし、何人かの生徒が少しずつ心を開き始めた中、まだ内気な生徒もいたことに気づき、自身も内気だった時期があったため、気持ちはよくわかると、上等兵は彼らと会話をするよう努めたと話した。

     トピックのひとつには沖縄料理の説明もあった。簡単なことのように思えるが、梅原渉外官は参加者らに、たとえうまく説明できなくても、料理の作り方、材料、栄養の効能など、知識をフルに使って、あらゆる角度から説明してほしかったという。

     英語交流の後の渉外官が立てた計画は同基地内のさまざまな場所で昼食をとることだった。ダイニング・スタイルのレストラン「天願キャッスル」、ファーストフード店「ブルドッグ」、普段は隊員しか食べることのできない食堂など、さまざまなタイプの食事環境を体験してもらおうと考えたのだ。毎日午後には、図書館、体育館、カミサリー(食料品店)、エクスチェンジ・ストア(小売店)、兵舎などの基地施設を見学した。

     「アメリカ人がどんな部屋に住んでいて、どんなものを普段食べているのかを体験できたので、同じ人間なんだと少し親近感がわきました」と高2の仲村美利亜さん。

     夏期英語クラスでは、楽しみを加えることも忘れない。渉外官は平日の昼間にもかかわらず、参加者に週末の夜のアメリカのボウリング場の雰囲気を体験してもらおうと、施設側にパーティー用のライトをつけるよう依頼した。

     キャンプ・シュワブと名護市辺野古区訪問

     4日目は、キャンプ・シュワブと名護市辺野古区事務所に一日かけての社会見学。キャンプ・シュワブ業務事務所長、同基地渉外官から、キャンプ・シュワブの存在意義、活動内容を学び、島袋茂辺野古区長の視点から、区民と隊員の関係などを知った。

     キャンプ・シュワブでの交流では、参加者は2人の海兵隊員に、海兵隊普天間飛行場の辺野古移設に向けての辺野古沿岸部の埋め立て工事が始まった2018年以来続いているゲート外での抗議活動や辺野古埋め立てについての考えを尋ねた。

     一人の隊員は、ゲートの外の人達からも地元の人達からも嫌な思いをしたことはないと答え、「私たち(アメリカ人)がいいと思うことは、ここに(地元)いる人たちがいいと思うこととは違います。時にはそれは誤解であり、私たちが取り組まなければならないことなのです」と述べた。また、別の隊員は辺野古への移設を知らず、ただの埋立だと思っていたと語り、多くの参加者を驚かせた。

     島袋区長は参加者からの質疑応答を受け、過去の思い出を少し語り、キャンプ・シュワブ創設以来65年間、区民がどのようにキャンプ・シュワブに対処してきたかを紹介。

     「私たちの状況を誤解している人がたくさんいます。私たち住民は、軍人と良好な関係を築いています。彼ら(キャンプ・シュワブと海兵隊)は私たちの地区の一部であり、11班の旗を持ち、地域のイベントや活動にも参加しています。私たちの考えは 『みんな友達 』なんです」と説明した。

     地元の高校に通う2年生の金城香凜さんは、埋め立ての理由や米軍基地が沖縄に存在する理由を考えたことがなかったとコメントした。

     「私には難しかったです。テレビで反対派の意見をたくさん見ていたので、そうなのだと思っていました。基地の人たちの話を聞いて、いろいろな意見があるんだなと思いました。ひとつの意見だけでなく、他の意見にも耳を傾けることが大切だと分かりました」と金城さんは話す。

     夏期英語クラスを終えて

     大学1年の永山晏妃さんは、夏期英語クラスに参加した当初は英語が話せればいいという考えを持っていたが、その国の文化や外国人が抱える問題も理解したほうがいいと気づいたという。

     永山さんは、ずっと沖縄に住んでいたにもかかわらず、知らないことがたくさんあったと話し、「言葉や文化、そして自分が住んでいる沖縄についてもっと勉強して、交流を深めていきたい」と語った。

     夏期英語クラスに同行したうるま市市民生活部市民協働政策課の安座間ゆうなさんは、学生たちの素直さに驚きつつも、その可能性に好感を持ったという。「異文化に触れることは衝撃的な体験だった生徒もいましたが、異なる考え方や見方を知ることで、将来の幅広い選択肢があることに気づくきっかけにもなったのではないでしょうか」と述べた。

     5日間にわたる夏期英語クラスは、親睦を深めるためのバーベキューで幕を閉じた。海兵隊ボランティアが協力して料理を提供し、同時に施設の外でスポーツをする生徒たちと交流した。

    NEWS INFO

    Date Taken: 01.22.2024
    Date Posted: 02.09.2024 01:14
    Story ID: 463442
    Location: OKINAWA, JP

    Web Views: 85
    Downloads: 0

    PUBLIC DOMAIN