Maintenance window scheduled to begin at February 14th 2200 est. until 0400 est. February 15th

(e.g. yourname@email.com)

Forgot Password?

    Defense Visual Information Distribution Service Logo

    USMC OKINAWA RESUMES FACE-TO-FACE ORIENTATION FOR NEWCOMERS / 新規来沖者、対面式説明会再開 - 良き隣人目指し、目標や規範を伝授

    USMC OKINAWA RESUMES FACE-TO-FACE ORIENTATION FOR NEWCOMERS

    Photo By Yoshie Makiyama | Attendees watch a video on safe driving in Okinawa.... read more read more

    OKINAWA, JAPAN

    09.12.2022

    Story by Yoshie Makiyama 

    Marine Corps Installations Pacific

    Okinawa, Japan’s southernmost prefecture, is home to thousands of Marines, sailors, civilians, and contractors, who are stationed at Marine Corps facilities, along with their families.

    For new arrivals, the Personal and Professional Development–Resources Program, Marine Corps Community Services Okinawa, facilitates a mandatory Newcomers Orientation Welcome Aboard brief to have them learn about their new home. The class takes place every Wednesday, throughout the year.

    The in-person NOWA brief resumed June 1, for the first time in almost two years, at the Camp Foster Community Center. The brief was forced to shift online in October 2020 due to the COVID-19 outbreak.

    NOWA is required for all accompanied Status of Forces Agreement personnel and their families, including children 10 years and older, as well as unaccompanied Marine and Navy staff noncommissioned officers and officers, all civilians, to take within 72 hours of their arrival in Okinawa.

    Unaccompanied Marines and sailors of ranks E-1 through E-5 attend the Joint Reception Center brief, separate from NOWA, but more specific to their training needs.

    "The intent of the NOWA brief is to provide an effective indoctrination training program, which educates SOFA status personnel and their families, prepares them for a successful and enjoyable tour in Japan, and to reduce misconduct and violations of law," stated Anabel Hayden, supervisory resources specialist with the Marine and Family Program, MCCS Okinawa.

    Representatives from multiple departments and offices explained not only the military community programs and services available to them, but also the customs and culture of Okinawa and their responsibilities as a member of this military community.

    The first person to brief the audience was Sgt. Maj. Joy M. Kitashima, former sergeant major, Marine Corps Installations Pacific, Marine Corps Base Camp Butler, who also handled the virtual NOWA online training videos during COVID.

    Along with explaining curfews and off-limit areas, she provided an overview of what to expect while stationed in Okinawa, including fun and recreational areas such as beaches, festivals, tug-of-wars and parks, as well as more local sensitivities such as the 1995 incident that greatly affected the relationship between the U.S. military and Okinawan communities, and the Futenma Replacement Facility.

    Kitashima, who attended the NOWA brief with her family during her last tour on Okinawa in 2014, said that she did not know what she did not know. "Everyone said to the newcomers to behave but did not say how amazing Okinawa was or how they could get involved with its people.

    “Life is different here in Okinawa. It’s amazing. It’s beautiful and people are incredible,” said Kitashima. “However, actions of families and service members could have potential consequences if they are not thoughtful.”

    According to Kitashima, the briefs are based on what is occurring at the time. If there are liberty incidents or misconduct, the presenters put more weight on such topics because the Marine Corps wants to prevent incidents from happening again in the future.

    “Be professional, we are here to represent all of the U.S.,” Timothy J. Morello, deputy assistant chief of staff of G-7, Government and External Affairs, Marine Corps Installations Pacific, stated during his session.

    Morello talked about how an incident such as driving under the influence would have a tremendous impact on the community. He emphasized that if people do not obey the law in Japan, they will serve time in Japanese prison.

    “‘Not One Drop’ campaign is real,” he said, referring to the Marine Corps' campaign against drinking and driving. In Okinawa, the blood alcohol content for a DUI is only 0.03% (0.3mg/ml), vice 0.08% (0.8mg/ml) for the U.S.: one drink is enough to put people over the limit.

    One participant—who only wanted to be identified by her first name, Jennifer—had never been to Okinawa and attended the brief with her children. Although many portions were geared more to adults, having teenagers, she appreciated the information because it helps them understand how their behavior can make a difference in the community.

    “A lot of information focused on expectations and rules, and community relations that we realized are important as well, but the cultural information after lunch, we really enjoyed,” said Jennifer. “It helps us feel like we know a little more about coming into our new home.”

    Her 15 year-old son expressed that the biggest takeaway was the cultural awareness dos and don’ts in Japan, and the water safety video because, though they have been around many beach communities, they have never been to beaches with reefs and numerous diving locations.

    Newcomers to Okinawa also have to complete NOWA before being eligible to receive driving privileges in Okinawa. Those with a valid driver's license that wish to drive, will watch a 10-minute video which gives an idea of how to drive in Okinawa and take the driving test at the end of NOWA.

    The highest obstacle will be driving on the opposite side of the road from the states, and the speed limits marked in kilometers per hour. The video shows narrower roads compared to standard American roads, traffic congestion, and explains coral dust-laden roads being slick when it rains.

    As the first in-person brief in nearly two years, this class was smaller than years past, with only 66 participants. Future briefs are expected to garner more than 100 participants as the summer PCS (permanent change of station) season ramps up.

     日本最南端の県である沖縄には、米海兵隊施設に配属された数千人の隊員、民間人従業員、そしてその家族が暮らしている。

     新規来沖者には、新しい故郷について学べるようにと、年間を通じて毎週水曜日に在沖海兵隊福利厚生部のマリン&ファミリープログラムが開催する新規来沖者説明会を受講することが義務付けてられている。

     6月1日、約2年ぶりにキャンプ・フォスターのコミュニティーセンターで、対面式の説明会が再開された。

     新型コロナ感染症の発生以前は、説明会は毎週水曜日の午前7時20分から午後2時まで対面式で行われていた。しかし、コロナ禍を受けて2020年10月からはオンラインに移行せざるを得なくなった。

     この説明会は、日米地位協定に基づくすべての隊員、民間人従業員、10歳以上の子どもを含むその家族、また単身赴任の上級下士官・将校に、沖縄到着後72時間以内に受講することが義務づけられている。

     単身赴任の下級下士官は、新規来沖者説明会とは別の、しかし同様のオリエンテーションに参加する。

     在沖海兵隊福利厚生部マリン&ファミリープログラム担当のアナベル・ヘイデンさんは、「このオリエンテーションの目的は、日米地位協定下に置かれる軍人、軍属とその家族を対象に効果的な教化訓練プログラムを設け、日本での任務を成功させより充実したものとするための準備をすることであり、不祥事や法律違反を可能な限り減らすことです」と話す。

     説明会は複数の部署やオフィスの専門員が、軍関係のプログラムやサービスだけでなく、沖縄の習慣や文化、軍関係者の一員としての責任について説明する。

     最初に発表を行ったのは、コロナ禍において、新規来沖者オンライントレーニングのビデオも担当した米海兵隊太平洋基地バトラー基地ジョイ・M・キタシマ最先任上級曹長だ。

     キタシマ最先任上級曹長は、ビーチ、祭り、綱引き、公園などの楽しい娯楽施設関係だけでなく、門限や立ち入り禁止区域の説明とともに、米軍と沖縄社会の関係に大きな影響を与えた1995年の事件、普天間代替施設など、より地元住民が関心を寄せる事情も含め、沖縄駐留中の注意事項について紹介した。

     前回の沖縄赴任中の2014年には、家族で説明会を受ける側として参加した最先任上級曹長は、「何を知らないのか」すら分からなかったと話し、みな新来者にマナーを守れとは言うが、沖縄がいかに素晴らしいのか、どうすれば沖縄の人と関われるのかは教えてくれなかったと振り返る。

     「ここ沖縄では、生活が違う。本当に素晴らしい。美しいし、人々も最高です」と最先任上級曹長。「しかし、家族や軍人の行動は、下手をすると取り返しのつかないことになる可能性があります。」

     最先任上級曹長によると、研修の内容はその時々に起きていることに基づいているそうだ。海兵隊は、今後の再発を防ぐため、事件や不祥事があれば、そのような話題に重きを置いて説明するのだという。

     「プロフェッショナルであれ、我々は米国を代表する存在である」は、米海兵隊太平洋基地政務外交部次長のティモシー・J・モレロ氏。

     モレロ氏は、飲酒運転といった事件が起きると、地域社会に多大な影響を与えることを話した。また、日本で法律を守らなければ、日本の刑務所で服役することになることを強調。

     海兵隊の飲酒運転撲滅キャンペーン「ノット・ワン・ドロップ(一滴もダメ)」は言葉通りだ」とモレロ氏。アメリカでは飲酒運転の血中アルコール濃度は 0.08%(0.8mg\ml)だが、沖縄では 0.03%(0.3mg\ml)であり、一杯でも飲めば基準値を超えてしまう。

     来沖するのは初めてというジェニファーさんは、4人の子どもと共に参加。情報の多くは大人向けだったが、自身10代の子供がいるため、自分たちの行動が地域社会に影響を与えると理解することができ感謝していると述べた。

     「多くの情報は、期待や規則、地域社会との関係性に焦点を当てたもの でしたが、それらもまた重要であることがわか りました」とジェニファーさん。「しかし、昼食後の異文化紹介は、本当に楽しいものでした。新しい土地で暮らすにあたって、より多くのことを知ることができたと思います。」

     15歳になる息子のケイレブ君は、日本での文化的な注意事項や、水の安全に関するビデオを見たことが一番の収穫だったと言う。なぜなら、これまで海水浴場近辺に住むことは多々あったものの、サンゴ礁のあるビーチやダイビングスポットに行ったことはなかったからだ。

     新規来沖者は、沖縄で運転免許を取得する前に、このオリエンテーションを修了しなければならない。免許取得希望者は、まず沖縄での運転方法を紹介する約10分間のビデオを見て、オリエンテーション終了後に試験を受けることになる。

     沖縄での運転で最も高い障害となるのは、アメリカと反対側の走行と、キロメーターで表示される制限速度だ。ビデオでは、一般的なアメリカの道路に比べて狭い道や、渋滞が多いこと、雨が降ると路面が滑りやすくなることなどが紹介されている。

     約2年ぶりの対面式オリエンテーションとなる今回は、例年より少ない66人の新規来沖者が参加した。今後は、軍人、軍属の夏の異動シーズンに突入するため、100人以上の参加者が予想される。

    LEAVE A COMMENT

    NEWS INFO

    Date Taken: 09.12.2022
    Date Posted: 10.02.2022 19:50
    Story ID: 430442
    Location: OKINAWA, JP

    Web Views: 224
    Downloads: 0

    PUBLIC DOMAIN