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    Fort McCoy ArtiFACT: Bifurcate base projectile points

    Fort McCoy ArtiFACT: Bifurcate base projectile points

    Courtesy Photo | Bifurcate base projectile points that were discovered on Fort McCoy are shown. These...... read more read more

    FORT MCCOY, UNITED STATES

    05.22.2020

    Story by Aimee Malone 

    Fort McCoy Public Affairs Office           

    The Fort McCoy Directorate of Public Works Environmental Division Natural Resources Branch has hosted and coordinated archaeological investigations for several decades.

    These investigations have identified more than 500 archaeological sites that have been attributed to human activity spanning more than 10,000 years. Some time periods are better represented than others, but the least common time period in the archaeological record of Fort McCoy is not the oldest.

    The oldest discrete time period for which investigators have clear evidence is the Late Paleoindian Tradition, which dates to approximately 12,000-10,000 years ago. There are 22 sites that are associated with this period of prehistory.

    The Early Archaic Period follows immediately after the Late Paleoindian Tradition, but only nine sites at Fort McCoy have produced artifacts or datable materials that link them to this time, which was approximately 10,000-8,000 years ago.

    Rarer still are a specific type of projectile point commonly attributed to the Early Archaic Period: the bifurcate base projectile point.

    Only two sites at Fort McCoy have produced this projectile point style, named for the distinctive look of the base. These tools were intentionally notched at the base, presumably to make it easier to haft.

    Hafting is the term for attaching projectile points onto the end of long, straight sticks to create spears. The spear can then be used as a melee weapon or launched with another tool known as an atlatl.

    All archaeological work conducted at Fort McCoy is coordinated by the Directorate of Public Works Environmental Division Natural Resources Branch.

    Visitors and employees are reminded they should not collect artifacts on Fort McCoy or other government lands and leave the digging to the professionals.

    Any person who excavates, removes, damages, or otherwise alters or defaces any historic or prehistoric site, artifact, or object of antiquity on Fort McCoy is in violation of federal law.

    The discovery of any archaeological artifact should be reported to the Directorate of Public Works Environmental Division Natural Resources Branch at 608-388-8214.

    (Article prepared by the Directorate of Public Works Environmental Division Natural Resources Branch.)

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    NEWS INFO

    Date Taken: 05.22.2020
    Date Posted: 05.22.2020 14:46
    Story ID: 370669
    Location: FORT MCCOY, US

    Web Views: 14
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