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    Holocaust Audio Tour

    Holocaust Audio Tour

    Audio | National Museum of the U.S. Air Force

    About

    This tour explores the "Prejudice and Memory: A Holocaust Exhibit," which is made up of photographs, artifacts and memories of people who live in the Dayton, Ohio, area.



    Episodes


    • Holocaust Audio Tour 16: Conclusion

      Thank you for taking your time to learn about the Holocaust and those persons living in the Dayton area who were affected by this historic and tragic event. Please check the museum’s website to listen to oral histories from people who witnessed these events first-hand. We hope that the sharing of this knowledge will ensure that a similar event is prevented in the future.

      09/10/2015


    • Holocaust Audio Tour 15: Parallel Tracks to Germany

      On the wall you will see photos of railcars. These are called “forty and eights.” During World War I, many American “Doughboys” traveled to the front in French railcars displaying the notice that each car could carry 40 men or eight horses. Therefore, they quickly became known as “forty and eight” railcars. In World War II, “forty and eights” again transported supplies and troops to the front, but they also carried new cargo. Millions of Holocaust victims were herded into... read more

      09/10/2015


    • Holocaust Audio Tour 14: Henry Wyrobnik

      Go to the photo cut out of the man showing a concentration camp tattoo on his forearm. This man is Henry Wyrobnik. Henry was born in Lodz, Poland. He, his parents, siblings and many other family members were put into the Lodz Ghetto by the Nazis until August 1944, when he and his family were sent to Auschwitz. Henry shared some reflections of his experiences. As the Allied Armies approached, he and thousands of others were taken on a Death March beginning on Jan. 15, 1945. They were given... read more

      09/10/2015


    • Holocaust Audio Tour 12: The Violin

      Move to the violin on exhibit to learn Robert Kahn’s history. Mr. Kahn recounted his experience in a letter: “59 years ago on November 9, 1938, a teenager 15 years old, experienced the most violent, barbaric display of anti-Semitic acts ever recorded in history. I was that teenager! The day began by witnessing the purposeful destruction of the only Jewish school in the area, while people cheered and applauded. It was my school. Then, as I hurried home on my bike, I arrived to see a mob... read more

      09/10/2015


    • Holocaust Audio Tour 11: A Liberator’s Jacket

      Go to the glass exhibit case containing a leather pilot’s jacket. This jacket belonged to Sgt. Delbert Cooper. In 1943, Cooper served as a solider in the U.S. Army’s 14th Regiment, 71st Infantry Division. His story can be heard in the video in this exhibit. He was among the first Americans to enter and assist in liberating Gunzkirchen Lager, which was part of the Mauthausen-Gusen concentration camp in Austria.

      09/10/2015


    • Holocaust Audio Tour 10: Fragments of the Budapest Ghetto

      Near the “Places of Ha’Shoah” images is another grouping titled “Fragments of the Budapest Ghetto.” These scenes are from an old Jewish section of Pest, Hungary, a district of 19th century buildings near the Danube River. Here the Nazis established a large ghetto in June 1944, several months after occupying Hungary and deporting virtually every Jew living in the provinces. Budapest’s 220,000 Jews were forced into 2,000 houses marked with a yellow star. In October, Hungarian... read more

      09/10/2015


    • Holocaust Audio Tour 08: Concentration Camp Uniform

      Move to the long striped jacket in the glass exhibit case. Perhaps the rarest artifact in this exhibit, this concentration camp uniform is one of very few still in existence. It was given to the exhibit by Jack Bomstein, whose father Moritz wore the uniform while he was imprisoned at Buchenwald. Allied Prisoners of War, or POWs, interned at Buchenwald in 1944, had their U.S. uniforms taken away and were forced to wear uniforms similar to this one.

      09/10/2015


    • Holocaust Audio Tour 07: Timeline

      Along the floor path of the Holocaust exhibit, you will find a timeline of a brief history of human rights in the 20th century. This retrospective includes not only issues relevant to the Holocaust, but to all matters of human rights from across the globe from 1901 to 1950.

      09/10/2015


    • Holocaust Audio Tour 06: Liberation

      By May 1945, Nazi Germany had collapsed. American and Soviet troops liberated the camps and were shocked at the conditions they found. They were sickened by the sight of thousands of dead bodies stacked on top of each other. Most of the survivors resembled living skeletons. Even after they were freed, the Jews had problems. Most survivors had no homes to return to and so they immigrated to places like the United States, where they could start a new life. The word “Holocaust” means... read more

      09/10/2015


    • Holocaust Audio Tour 05: The Final Solution

      In June 1941 Germany invaded the Soviet Union. Following the army were special mobile killing units known as Einsatzgruppen. They rounded up Jews and murdered them. More than one million Jews and millions of Soviet citizens were killed. In January 1942 Nazi leaders decided to kill all Jews living in the areas occupied by the German army. This project, which became a national priority for Germans, was known as the “Final Solution to the Jewish Problem.” Within a few months, the Germans... read more

      09/10/2015


    • Holocaust Audio Tour 04: The Terror Begins

      Hitler came to power legally in January 1933, promising to remove Jewish influence from German life. In April 1933, Germans burned Jewish books and forced most Jewish government employees and professionals to leave their jobs. Jewish life was further restricted by September 1935 by the passage of the Nuremburg Laws. These laws identified Jews by the religion of their grandparents. Some people who practiced Christianity discovered they were now classified as Jews who lost all rights of... read more

      09/10/2015


    • Holocaust Audio Tour 03: History of the Holocaust

      Stand on the opposite side of the granite wall of photographs. Within this exhibit is a wall of photos and other artifacts that provide an in-depth history of the Holocaust. The first panel, titled “Prejudice and Lies,” provides an historic overview of the Holocaust. Survivors of the World War II Holocaust and their families are living among us. They are European Jews who have survived the Nazi effort to systematically exterminate the world’s Jewish population between 1933 and 1945.... read more

      09/10/2015


    • Holocaust Audio Tour 02: Introduction

      “Prejudice and Memory: A Holocaust Exhibit” is made up of the photographs, artifacts and memories of people who live in the Dayton, Ohio, area. Among the contributors are concentration camp survivors and their families, liberators – soldiers who helped to free those held in concentration camps – and “righteous Gentiles” – non-Jews who helped Jews during the Holocaust. It is one of the few exhibits in the U.S. compiled to demonstrate one community’s connection with this terrible event and to affirm the belief that learning about the Holocaust is the first step toward preventing its recurrence.

      09/10/2015


    • Holocaust Audio Tour 01: About the Exhibit

      Stand at the “gate” to enter the Holocaust exhibit. I’m Renate Frydman, project director and curator for the “Prejudice and Memory” exhibit. In the years since 1960 when I first began speaking about the Holocaust, audiences have most responded to the personal items – a singular family picture, a passport with a red letter ”J,” a letter stating when and where grandparents were sent to be killed. The Holocaust exhibit at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force brings the... read more

      09/10/2015


    • Holocaust Audio Tour 13: A Child’s Prized Possession

      The next artifact is an accordion contained in a glass exhibit case. This artifact introduces us to the Kindertransport, a program created in 1938 that allowed 10,000 predominantly Jewish children from Nazi Germany, Austria and Poland to flee to the United Kingdom. Those children were placed in foster homes, hostels and schools. They were often the only members of their families to survive the Holocaust. This accordion allows the museum to share the story of Gertrude Wolff, one of those... read more

      12/31/1969


    • Holocaust Audio Tour 9: Places of Ha’Shoah

      Move to the grouping of photos on the left side of this exhibit. These buildings and places represent “Places of Ha’Shoah” – places where the events of the Holocaust took place. Tucson photographer Cy Lehrer used heavy black borders and film base to enhance the dramatic effect of his imagery. This technique encourages the viewer to experience the starkness of the photo and suggests an environment that would allow for incomprehensible crimes to take place.

      12/31/1969