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Images: Solar project at Fort Hunter Liggett [Image 1 of 4]

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Solar project at Fort Hunter Liggett

Solar panel arrays form a canopy at a construction site in Fort Hunter Liggett, Calif., March 12, 2013. The construction site is for phase one and two of a solar microgrid project at the installation, managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District. Phase one was completed in April 2012 and generates one megawatt of power, enough energy to power 250 to 300 homes. Phase two, scheduled for completion in May 2013, will generate an additional one megawatt of power and is expected to be the second of four at the post. The Sacramento District awarded contracts of $8.4 million for phase one and $9.7 million for phase two. Along with the energy production, the cover provided by the panel arrays will shade the majority of the post’s vehicles. Fort Hunter Liggett is one of six pilot installations selected by the U.S. Army to be net zero energy, meaning the installation will create as much energy as it uses. (U.S. Army photo by John Prettyman/Released)



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Public Domain Mark
This work, Solar project at Fort Hunter Liggett [Image 1 of 4], by John Prettyman, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:03.12.2013

Date Posted:04.03.2013 13:53

Photo ID:899842

VIRIN:130312-A-AN535-020

Resolution:4928x3264

Size:2.51 MB

Location:SACRAMENTO, CA, USGlobe

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