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Images: Recruiting through training - The drill sergeant way [Image 1 of 3]

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Recruiting through training - The drill sergeant way

Instructor, Staff Sgt. Ryan Slomp has other instructors demonstrate
how to gain or maintain possession of a weapon. Experience has shown that nearly all hand-to-hand combat situations involve grappling for control of a weapon.



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Public Domain Mark
This work, Recruiting through training - The drill sergeant way [Image 1 of 3], by MAJ Jennifer Mack, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:01.13.2013

Date Posted:01.13.2013 22:49

Photo ID:813928

VIRIN:130113-A-AR123-003

Resolution:4272x2848

Size:3.8 MB

Location:PORTAGE, MI, USGlobe

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