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Images: A shot in the dark: 'Dragon' Battalion medics conduct no-light intravenous training [Image 3 of 3]

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A shot in the dark: 'Dragon' Battalion medics conduct no-light intravenous training

Spc. George Wilson (left), a medic with Company C, 1st “Dragon” Battalion, 63rd Armor Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, United States Division – Center, and a San Antonio native, begins to conduct an intravenous “stick” on a simulated casualty using his night optics device Sept. 2, 2011 at Joint Security Station Muthana, Iraq. Company C medics constantly challenge themselves to train for the worst case scenario — in this case, administering IV injections without a light source. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jeremy Coleman)



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Public Domain Mark
This work, A shot in the dark: 'Dragon' Battalion medics conduct no-light intravenous training [Image 3 of 3], is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:09.02.2011

Date Posted:09.09.2011 02:39

Photo ID:453350

VIRIN:110902-A-#####-001

Resolution:1024x902

Size:286.83 KB

Location:BAGHDAD, IQGlobe

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  • Spc. Wayne Holmes, of Houston, Texas, and a combat medic for 4th Platoon, Attack Company, 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, sticks an intravenous needle into the arm of Sgt. Samuel Camp, a native of Perkasie, Pa., and a mortar team leader for 4th Platoon, in front of on looking Iraqi policeman at the police station in Imam Mansoor, Iraq, April 18. Holmes demonstrated to the IPs how to administer an IV in case they'll ever have to give fluids to someone while conducting unilateral operations.
  • Spc. Thomas Bundy, left, a line medic with Company C, 1st Battalion, 63rd Armor Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, United States Division – Center and an Albuquerque, N.M., native, sets up an intravenous line on a simulated casualty June 19, 2011, at Joint Security Station Muthana, Iraq. Bundy trained as part of a trauma team, and his responsibilities include initiating IVs on the patient. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Jeremy Coleman, 2nd AAB, 1st Inf. Div., USD-C)
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A shot in the dark: 'Dragon' Battalion medics conduct no-light intravenous training

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