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Road to equality in Marine Corps remembered

Alford L. McMichael, 14th Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps retired, was the first African-American Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps on July 1, 1999. He later served as the senior enlisted advisor to NATO in June 2003 and retired in October 2006. McMichael paved the way for future African Americans to step into larger roles in the Marine Corps.



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This work, Road to equality in Marine Corps remembered [Image 2 of 2], is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:02.01.2014

Date Posted:02.04.2014 17:34

Photo ID:1161377

VIRIN:130702-F-XY000-005

Resolution:1280x720

Size:65.68 KB

Location:MARINE CORPS AIR STATION MIRAMAR, CA, USGlobe

Hometown:SAN DIEGO, CA, US

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  • Autographing his book, former Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Alford L. McMichael, talks to Cpl. Matthew McPheeters, ammunition technician, Headquarters Company, 3rd Marine Regiment. McMichael visited Feb. 22 to speak at the base's African-American Heritage Month Luncheon.
  • Former Sgt. Maj. of the Marine Corps, Alford L. McMichael, addresses original Montford Point Marines during a reception held in their honor at the National Sheraton Hotel in Arlington, Va, June 26, 2012. The Montford Marines, the first African-Americans allowed to enlist in the Marine Corps, are being honored this week with the highest civilian award in the United States, the Congressional Gold Medal. (U.S. Marine Corp photo by Cpl. Scott R. Picklesimer/Released)
  • Former Sgts. Maj. of the Marine Corps Alford L. McMichael, second from left, John L. Estrada, center, and Carlton W. Kent, second from right, pose for a photo with Montford Point Marine Association members during a reception in honor of Montford Point Marines at the Radisson Hotel at Reagan National Airport in Crystal City, Va, June 26, 2012. The Montford Marines, the first African-Americans allowed to enlist in the Marine Corps, were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest civilian award in the United States. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Christopher A. Green/Released)
  • From left, former Sgts. Maj. of the Marine Corps Alford L. McMichael, John L. Estrada and Carlton W. Kent pose for a photo with a Montford Point Marine Association member during a reception in honor of Montford Point Marines at the Radisson Hotel at Reagan National Airport in Crystal City, Va, June 26, 2012. The Montford Marines, the first African-Americans allowed to enlist in the Marine Corps, were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest civilian award in the United States. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Christopher A. Green/Released)

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Road to equality in Marine Corps remembered

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