Video Icon

Video: Spring Valley FUDS Site - Clean

Video by Mary CochranSmall RSS IconSubscriptions Icon


Embed code ▼

Mission During the past 200 years, some activities supporting military readinesshave resulted in the need for environmental cleanup within the United States and its territories. The Department of Defense, the U.S. Army and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are committed to protecting human health and the environment and improving public safety by cleaning up these properties. These properties include Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS), which, when under the jurisdiction of DoD prior to October 1986, were used for a variety of purposes, including training and supporting Soldiers, airmen, sailors, and Marines, as well as to test new weapons and warfare capabilities. When no longer needed, many of these properties were cleaned up according to the best practices available at the time and then transferred to other owners such as private individuals or federal, state, tribal, or local government entities. Congress created the FUDS program in the mid-1980’s. Under Army oversight, the Corps of Engineers executes the program pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liabilities Act, as amended (CERCLA). That work includes identifying eligible properties, investigating their condition and addressing any contamination by hazardous substances contamination that was the result of DoD activities. FUDS cleanups can include remediation of munitions that remain on site. The Corps of Engineers is committed to addressing this contamination in a safe, timely, and responsive manner. Teams from Corps of Engineers districts consult with state environmental and health offices, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, landowners and the public in performing the work. Scope The more than 10,000 potential FUDS properties across the country and its territories can range from less than an acre to hundreds of thousands of acres, and can be found in industrial or residential areas as well as on federal, tribal or state properties. Cleanup projects are planned or ongoing at about 2,700 of the properties determined to be eligible for inclusion in the program. A single property may have more than one cleanup project. The type of cleanup required varies from property to property, and can include cleaning up hazardous, toxic and radioactive waste sites; removing munitions and explosives of concern and munitions constituents; or doing building demolition and debris removal if the building or structure was unsafe at the time of transfer. The Corps of Engineers districts employ a risk management approach in accomplishing the cleanup, which follows CERCLA. Most projects take several years to complete, and each is unique. Active communication, coordination, consultation and collaboration with property owners, state and federal regulators, tribal and local governments, local communities and other potentially responsible parties are critical in planning and carrying out cleanups. The Corps of Engineers works hard to keep all interested parties informed and offers opportunities for dialogue throughout all cleanup phases. FUDS program expenditures through fiscal year 2012 total $5.8 billion. Program completion is projected at $14 billion based on 2012 dollars. Annual funding has been about $250 million a year. More information about the FUDS program is available at www.fuds.mil. Also available in high definition.


Web Views
99
Downloads
4
High-Res. Downloads
4

Podcast Hits
0



Public Domain Mark
This work, Spring Valley FUDS Site - Clean, by Mary Cochran, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:12.7.2012

Date Posted:12.7.2012 3:57PM

Category:B-Roll

Video ID:192731

VIRIN:121207-A-#####-344

Filename:DOD_100661835

Length:00:01:49

Location:US

More Like This

  • Corps of Engineers starts removing house at 4825 Glenbrook Road N.W., part of Spring Valley Formerly Used Defense Site

Washington, D.C. -- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers started removing the house located at 4825 Glenbrook Road N.W. today. Clips of the demolition can be found on our Facebook page at: http://on.fb.me/Wx8VUW

This house is located on property within the Spring Valley Formerly Used Defense Site. In the World War I era, the property was part of a larger area known as the American University Experiment Station, where the U.S. government researched and tested chemical agents, equipment and munitions. During two previous investigations (2000 - 2002 and 2007 - 2010) the Army Corps of Engineers discovered materials of concern not only on the property, but adjacent to the house's foundation. Based on previous investigations, the house's removal provides the Corps of Engineers the access it requires for the thorough investigation of areas immediately adjacent to and under the house. 

House removal will take approximately two to three weeks to complete, with activities Monday - Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Although the Corps of Engineers does not anticipate a requirement for traffic detours or lane closures, personnel will direct vehicle and foot traffic within the 4800 block of Glenbrook Road to help ensure safety. Construction traffic will be minimal, 1 - 3 truck loads with construction debris per day. Access to 4825 Glenbrook Road N.W. will be restricted by a safety fence. All access points will remain secured after hours and on weekends. All debris will be either recycled or disposed of off-site in accordance with local, state and federal guidelines.

After the house's removal, the Corps of Engineers will cleanup and restore the property to residential standards, providing for its unrestricted future use. Throughout the entire process, the Corps of Engineers will use a series of proven controls and precautions to address safety and other concerns.

The Army and Corps of Engineers are committed to completing a thorough cleanup at this property in a manner that ensures the safety of the community and site workers.

For more information on the Spring Valley Formerly Used Defense Site and 4825 Glenbrook Road N.W. project visit the Web site at: http://bit.ly/SpringValleyFUDS Available in High Definition.
  • Along with the “3Rs” of education – reading, ‘riting and ‘rithmetic – all of us need to be students of the “3Rs” of explosives safety – recognize, retreat and report.  Our nation’s history includes a time, during World War II, when our military forces used our wide open spaces for training, testing and demonstrations.  Some cleanup was done when these activities stopped, but some old military munitions remain and could still be dangerous. Although these munitions are generally buried, some may occasionally appear on the surface of the ground. If you should see something that you think may be munitions, please follow the 3Rs of explosives safety: Recognize when you may have encountered a munition, and that munitions are dangerous. Retreat: do not touch, move or disturb it, but carefully leave the area, noting the location. Report: the object to local law enforcement by calling 911. Following these simple steps will earn you an A+.

This message brought to you by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
  • The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District completed a clean up project in Kingman, Ariz. The project is the first step in cleaning the former Kingman Ground-to-Ground Gunnery Range, which is a formerly used defense site. The project involved excavating in a residential area around homes. The District is planning to continue the project with more homes later this year. Also available in high definition
  • The 4825 Glenbrook Road property is located within the Spring Valley Formerly Used Defense Site. In the World War I era, the property was part of a larger area known as the American University Experiment Station, where the U.S. government researched and tested chemical agents, equipment and munitions. During two previous investigations (2000 - 2002 and 2007 - 2010) the Army Corps of Engineers discovered materials of concern not only on the property, but adjacent to the house's foundation. Based on previous investigations, the removal of the house provides the Corps of Engineers the access it requires for the thorough investigation of areas immediately adjacent to and under the house.

This video tour, led by project manager Brenda Barber, shows the current site and the various safety precautions and procedures in place as the excavation work continues in the upcoming weeks.

Options

  • Army
  • Marines
  • Navy
  • Air Force
  • Coast Guard
  • National Guard

HOLIDAY GREETINGS

SELECT A HOLIDAY:

VIDEO ON DEMAND

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Youtube
  • Flickr