U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District


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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District
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Recent News Stories

TVA welcomes partners in completion of new Cumberland River Aquatic Center TVA welcomes partners in completion of new Cumberland...
The Tennessee Valley Authority has a new $1.5 million Cumberland River Aquatic Center located next to the Gallatin Fossil Plant in Gallatin, Tenn.
Agencies team up to reopen Chickamauga Lock Agencies team up to reopen Chickamauga Lock
Teamwork and a valuable dialogue between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District and Tennessee Valley Authority led to a quick repair action that reopened...
Lee named Nashville District employee of the month for September 2014 Lee named Nashville District employee of the month for...
Jerry Lee, project engineer at the Mid Cumberland Construction Office, is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Employee of the Month for September 2014.
Chickamauga Lock to reopen the end of next week
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District plans to reopen Chickamauga Lock to all navigation traffic as early as Thursday, Nov. 6. An inspection of the upper...
Corps assessment reopens Chickamauga Lock at the end of next week Corps assessment reopens Chickamauga Lock at the end of...
Work crews assessed damage at Chickamauga Lock and plan to reopen Chickamauga Lock to all navigation traffic next week.
Public input sought for draft Mill Creek Feasibility Study
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District and Metro Nashville officials are seeking public input on the draft report and environmental assessment for the Mill...


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Recent Photos

TVA welcomes partners in completion of new Cumberland River Aquatic Center TVA welcomes partners in completion of new Cumberland...
(Left to right) Fred Ragan, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District chief of projects and planning; Mary Jennings, field supervisor, U.S. Fish and Wildlife...
Lee named Nashville District employee of the month for September 2014 Lee named Nashville District employee of the month for...
Jerry Lee, project engineer at the Mid Cumberland Construction Office, is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Employee of the Month for September 2014.
Agencies team up to reopen Chickamauga Lock Agencies team up to reopen Chickamauga Lock
Lock and Dam Mechanic Craig Smith, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Tennessee Operations Center, welds a pull rod while repairing the upper gate...
Corps assessment reopens Chickamauga Lock at the end of next week Corps assessment reopens Chickamauga Lock at the end of...
Mechanics at the Chickamauga Lock in Chattanooga, Tenn., work on a part from the upper gate anchorage Oct. 30, 2014. 488018Engineers and work crews assessed damage at...
Maintenance makeover drains Wheeler Lock Maintenance makeover drains Wheeler Lock
The main Wheeler Navigational Lock is dry this week so work crews can inspect and repair underwater components. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District’s...
Stakeholders collaborate for good health of Stones River watershed Stakeholders collaborate for good health of Stones River...
J. Percy Priest Lake Park Ranger Amber Jones talks with Frank Bailey, a biology professor at Middle Tennessee State University, during a Stones River watershed...


Recent Video

Center Hill Dam Hydropower Turbine Model Meets Design Specifications Center Hill Dam Hydropower Turbine Model Meets Design...
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District officials witnessed a hydropower turbine model test at Voith Hydro’s S. Morgan Smith Memorial Laboratory Oct. 6-9,...
Tennessee Formalizes Silver Jackets Partnership Tennessee Formalizes Silver Jackets Partnership
Federal, state and local agencies formalized an official partnership to promote flood risk reduction by signing the Tennessee Silver Jackets Charter during a ceremony...
Crystal Gayle Wants Her Fans to Play it Safe Crystal Gayle Wants Her Fans to Play it Safe
Crystal Gayle wants her fans to play it safe when it comes to water safety. She visited the Country Music Hall of Fame Aug. 28, 2014 where she encouraged everyone to...
Oak Ridge Boys Say Life Jackets are Life Savers Oak Ridge Boys Say Life Jackets are Life Savers
The Oak Ridge Boys want their fans to know that life jackets are life savers. The group harmonized this very important water safety message Aug. 27, 2014 for...
Groundbreaking kicks off Hatchery Creek Project Groundbreaking kicks off Hatchery Creek Project
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, state legislators and Russell...
Nashville District Dive Team Quick-Response Capability Nashville District Dive Team Quick-Response Capability
The Nashville District Dive Team demonstrated its quick-response capability July 28, 2014 when it responded within two hours to inspect a gate that malfunctioned at...



TVA welcomes partners in completion of new Cumberland River Aquatic Center


Story by Mark Rankin

TVA welcomes partners in completion of new Cumberland River Aquatic Center GALLATIN, Tenn. - The Tennessee Valley Authority has a new $1.5 million Cumberland River Aquatic Center located next to the Gallatin Fossil Plant in Gallatin, Tenn.

Biologists from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District attended a brief ceremony marking the completion of the new facility. The state-of-the art building replaces an aged metal structure that was removed at the beginning of the Gallatin Fossil Plant’s $1 billion clean-air emissions project at Fossil Plant. Construction began May 2014.

Project Engineer for TVA Gary Wimberly thanked everyone involved and each agency for its dedication and commitment to sustain the environment.

Director of the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency Ed Carter said he had not visited the area since the old hatchery was demolished.

“I’m overwhelmed by the progress we have made to construct this facilty,” said Carter. “I have no doubt in my mind that there will be researchers from around the United States who will send grant money and invest in this facility so they can to be a part of this,” said Carter.

According to Tim Higgs, chief of Environmental Section, Project Planning Branch, Nashville District, several agencies signed a memorandum of understanding in 2011, including TVA, Corps of Engineers, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Nature Conservancy and the National Park Service to work together in protecting freshwater mussels on the Cumberland River and across Tennessee.

“We are pleased to see the new structure completed, and look forward to it becoming operational,” said Higgs. “When the raceways are completed this facility will have a lot more capabilities for future efforts to restore sensitive species and we’re excited about that,” said Higgs.

The Corps used mitigation funds from the emergency action to lower Lake Cumberland Reservoir in September 2008. The funds help refurbish raceways, acquire water supply, air supply, and electrical power to the facility.

Higgs said the Corps committed $700,000 for the work at the Cumberland River Aquatic Center at the Gallatin plant.

TVA vice president for Environment Brenda Brickhouse said the partnership between the agencies demonstrates TVA’s commitment to environmental stewardship. She added the partnership with the Corps recognizes the importance of conserving the rich aquatic biological diversity of fish, freshwater mussels and other aquatic species located in the Tennessee and Cumberland River systems.

“One of those reasons that the Corps is a full partner is that we sit here on the Cumberland River downstream from Wolf Creek Dam and the Corps is responsible for that,” said Brickhouse.

According to Brickhouse the new facility has a more flexible design with many capabilities. The new center will allow TWRA and its partners to better manage endangered species and collect data.

“Not only are we reducing our emissions at the fossil plant with construction, but the new facility will allow us to work on mitigation projects to ensure protection and growth of endangered species,” said Brickhouse.

About 75 percent of the 300 species of mussels once found in this country have gone extinct, are endangered or in need of management. Tennessee has about 110 species remaining, though they are in decline, which is a remarkably large number compared to most other states. The bivalves are valuable as biological water filters for rivers, for use in research and as food for other wildlife. Their shells are sought commercially for the cultured pearl industry.

Other partners in the project include the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Tennessee Nature Conservancy. The facility has also been used in university aquatic conservation research projects, including Tennessee Technological University, Middle Tennessee State University, The University of Tennessee-Knoxville and Virginia Tech University.

“We plan to continue our positive contribution to Tennessee’s diverse aquatic communities,” said Brickhouse. “It’s not about money, it’s about expertise.”

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TVA welcomes partners in completion of new Cumberland River Aquatic Center