U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District


Hometown: Nashville, TN, US

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District
Content Online
(USACEND)
84

0

291

1,225

0


DVIDS Media Specialist:
Tiffany McCall
tmccall@dvidshub.net
678-421-6626


  (2 Subscribers)


Recent News Stories

Music City workshop tunes up tribal consultations Music City workshop tunes up tribal consultations
State and federal agency representatives met in Music City this week to tune up and improve how they consult with tribal nations in a workshop hosted by the U.S. Army...
Project manager garners Buckeye notoriety in ‘Drive to the Championship’ Project manager garners Buckeye notoriety in ‘Drive to...
A project manager recently garnered Buckeye notoriety when several reporters from ABC Channel 6 from Columbus, Ohio, featured the Ohio State University football...
Boaters can navigate to Corps of Engineers booth for lake info Boaters can navigate to Corps of Engineers booth for...
Boating enthusiasts attending the 29th annual Nashville Boat and Sportshow at Music City Center are encouraged to navigate to the Corps of Engineers booth to get...
Granstaff named Nashville District Employee of the Month for November 2014 Granstaff named Nashville District Employee of the Month...
Matthew Granstaff, biologist in the Project Planning Branch, is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Employee of the Month for November 2014.
Restoring American Bald Eagle to upper Cumberland region a tall tale Restoring American Bald Eagle to upper Cumberland region...
Nurturing baby American Bald Eagles in a man-made crib atop a 23-foot tower seems like a tall tale, but that is exactly how biologists carried out a conservation plan...
Youth deer management hunt success for sponsors, youth Youth deer management hunt success for sponsors, youth
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in partnership with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency held the 4th Annual Defeated Creek Youth Deer Management Hunt at the...


Featured Video



Recent Photos

Project manager garners Buckeye notoriety in ‘Drive to the Championship’ Project manager garners Buckeye notoriety in ‘Drive to...
Jeff Linkinhoker, project manager in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District, poses Jan. 14, 2015, with his 1968 vintage Volkswagen Beetle that he...
Music City workshop tunes up tribal consultations Music City workshop tunes up tribal consultations
Chip Smith, assistant for Environment, Tribal and Regulatory Affairs in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works, takes a question from...
Boaters can navigate to Corps of Engineers booth for lake info Boaters can navigate to Corps of Engineers booth for...
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Park Ranger Charlie Leath, from the Old Hickory Lake, welcomes boating enthusiasts to the Corps booth at the 29th...
Granstaff named District Employee of the Month for November 2014 Granstaff named District Employee of the Month for...
Matthew Granstaff, biologist in the Project Planning Branch is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Employee of the Month for November 2014.
Neely named District Employee of the Month for August 2014 Neely named District Employee of the Month for August 2014
U.S. Army Corps of Engineer employee Jeff Neely, Lock and Dam operator at the Kentucky Lock is the Nashville district Employee of the Month for October 2014.
Restoring American Bald Eagle to upper Cumberland region a tall tale Restoring American Bald Eagle to upper Cumberland region...
Patty Coffey, deputy chief of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Operations Division, holds a photo in her office Dec. 8, 2014, of her hydrating a...


Recent Video

History of Eagles at Dale Hollow Lake Nestled in Restoration Project History of Eagles at Dale Hollow Lake Nestled in...
American Bald Eagles made a comeback in the upper Cumberland region of Tennessee and Kentucky thanks to an Eagle Restoration Program conducted by the U.S. Army Corps...
Center Hill Dam Hydropower Turbine Model Meets Design Specifications Center Hill Dam Hydropower Turbine Model Meets Design...
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District officials witnessed a hydropower turbine model test at Voith Hydro’s S. Morgan Smith Memorial Laboratory Oct. 6-9,...
Tennessee Formalizes Silver Jackets Partnership Tennessee Formalizes Silver Jackets Partnership
Federal, state and local agencies formalized an official partnership to promote flood risk reduction by signing the Tennessee Silver Jackets Charter during a ceremony...
Crystal Gayle Wants Her Fans to Play it Safe Crystal Gayle Wants Her Fans to Play it Safe
Crystal Gayle wants her fans to play it safe when it comes to water safety. She visited the Country Music Hall of Fame Aug. 28, 2014 where she encouraged everyone to...
Oak Ridge Boys Say Life Jackets are Life Savers Oak Ridge Boys Say Life Jackets are Life Savers
The Oak Ridge Boys want their fans to know that life jackets are life savers. The group harmonized this very important water safety message Aug. 27, 2014 for...
Groundbreaking kicks off Hatchery Creek Project Groundbreaking kicks off Hatchery Creek Project
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, state legislators and Russell...



Music City workshop tunes up tribal consultations


Story by Leon Roberts

Music City workshop tunes up tribal consultations NASHVILLE, Tenn. – State and federal agency representatives met in Music City this week to tune up and improve how they consult with tribal nations in a workshop hosted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District.

Participants attended sessions Jan. 12-14 at the Kefauver Federal Building that covered topics such as the history of federal Indian law, key laws that require consultation, Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, and government-to-government strategies. They also participated in exercises on multi-party facilitation and problem solving.

Chip Smith, assistant for Environment, Tribal and Regulatory Affairs with the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works, also talked about the “USACE Program and Authorities for Tribal Nations.”

Smith said over the past several decades the Army has been transforming its relationships with Native American nations, and he believes the key to working with tribes involves respect and communication.

“We now have a Tribal Community of Practice and we have Tribal Policy Principles. We decided to come up with very simple principles to simply communicate a message” – so it’s vital to establish relationships where agency representatives talk early, talk often and talk in advance with tribal nations, Smith said.

Charles Coleman, historic preservation officer with the Thlopthlocco Tribal Town of Oklahoma, attended the workshop and noted that communication is definitely a very important component of tribal relations.

Just knowing who to talk to and how to send and receive correspondence helps with effectively maintaining good relationships with tribes, and that improves understanding of the significance of cultural sites and historical preservation, he explained.

“At a meeting like this we see the many aspects that tribes go through and the Corps goes through and how we can better work together,” Smith said. “We have to be able to communicate … sometimes picking up the telephone will solve a lot of problems and save a lot of money.”

Coleman also joined Russ Townsend of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians on a panel where they fielded questions about how the Corps and federal government is doing with building and working on tribal issues.

Michael A. Ware, a supervisor in the Tulsa District Regulatory Division, said federal regulations can have an impact on tribal lands, so learning more about tribal consultations and having the chance to hear from tribal leaders helps him better serve the tribal nations in his district.

“I have about 15 pages of notes, so it’s helped me quite a bit,” Ware said about the workshop and opportunity to meet tribal leaders. “We need to be sensitive to their cultural histories and make sure that we are paying attention.”

Marsha K. Welch, an environmental archaeologist with the Tennessee Department of Transportation, also values the perspective of the tribal leaders because her agency works to avoid, mitigate or excavate cultural sites and areas when building new roadways.

She said the workshop and tribal panel have been driving the point of being culturally sensitive, and that it’s important to consult with the tribes early and to keep them involved.

“We definitely get to see things from the perspective of the tribe. To meet them in person is really important because it brings it down to a more personal level,” Welch said. “If we’re going to disrupt or disturb an archaeological site, it’s really important that they’re involved because it directly relates to ancestral hunting grounds or where they used to live before they were moved out with Andrew Jackson’s Indian removal policy.”

Valerie McCormack, archeological liaison for the Nashville District and the event’s organizer, said the workshop provided valuable training about sovereignty and the trust relationship the federal government has with tribes.

“There is the requirement to consult, but in doing so, the actual process of doing it, the actions involved, it’s oftentimes intercultural. So we, as an agency, have to understand the tribes’ background, their culture, so we don’t do something that just totally derails a good intent,” McCormack said. “The wrong comment or the wrong motion or that initial appearance can be enough to create a setback.”

McCormack said the government should constantly be building strong relationships with tribes before there are any issues. Holding workshops like this one can help tribes with self determination and avoid some of the common pitfalls that can hamper communication and collaboration, she added.

Agencies that participated in the workshop include the U.S. Department of Commerce’s First Responder Network Authority, Tennessee Valley Authority, U.S. Forest Service, and U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency. Corps districts involved includes the Nashville District, Tulsa District, Sacramento District, Albuquerque District, Buffalo District, Louisville District, Pittsburgh District, Huntington District, Mobile District, New York District, Little Rock District and St. Paul District. The Tennessee Historic Preservation Office and Department of Transportation also attended.

The tribal liaisons from across the Corps of Engineers also met Jan. 15-16 in Nashville to share knowledge, experiences and receive additional training.

(The public can obtain news, updates and information from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District on the district’s website at www.lrn.usace.army.mil, on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/nashvillecorps and on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/nashvillecorps.)

Featured Photo


Music City workshop tunes up tribal consultations