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875th Engineer Company makes a dent in Afghanistan 1st Lt. Brittany Ramos

A loader gathers base material used for roads and other infrastructure at Camp John Pratt, Sept. 20. Soldiers of the 875th Engineer Company work sunrise to sunset readying Camp John Pratt to serve as a major retrograde staging area in northern Afghanistan. (Photo by U.S. Army Capt. William Dudley, Task Force Hurricane)

BALKH PROVINCE, AFGHANISTAN –Camp John Pratt construction reached another milestone this week as the 875th Engineer Company (Horizontal) completed the large earthen dining facility pad and started excavation of the storm water retention pond. The storm water retention pond project will be essential to drainage of the 880-acre Camp, which was recently dedicated and named after fallen U.S. Chief Warrant Officer 5 John C. Pratt. The camp is purposed as an alternate retrograde staging area for troops and equipment leaving Afghanistan.

The construction of Camp John Pratt retrograde facilities is currently the largest troop-based construction effort and ranks as the number one construction priority Afghanistan. It has significant strategic importance as the 2014 International Security Assistance Force withdrawal deadline approaches.

The 411th Engineer Brigade, known as Joint Task Force Empire, manages a joint engineer task force composed of Army and Air Force engineers to accomplish this expansive construction mission. The 875th falls under the direct operational control of Task Force Hurricane, a conglomeration of Active, Reserve, and National Guard engineer units led by members of the 841st En. Bn. out of Miami, FL.

The 875th En. Co. hit the ground running in Afghanistan and continued cut and fill operations where the prior unit left off. The high sense of urgency continued as they transitioned to the storm water retention pond due to the approaching wet weather season. The equipment operators will move over 675,000 cubic yards of earth in sixty days. The end result will make a large dent in the Afghanistan countryside approximately twenty-seven acres by an average of fifteen feet deep. Capt. William Dudley, 875th company commander, acknowledges the challenges inherent in the project.

“The details of Camp John Pratt construction as an overall mission are very complex. The Storm-water Pond construction, as well as many of the other projects on this camp, allow for the opportunity for me to use all the military occupational specialties under my command and develop each Soldier’s job proficiency and leadership skills.”


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Public Domain Mark
This work, 875th Engineer Company makes a dent in Afghanistan, by 1LT Brittany Ramos, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:11.03.2012

Date Posted:11.03.2012 08:11

Location:BALKH PROVINCE, AFGlobe

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  • Camp John Pratt construction reached another milestone this week as the 875th Engineer Company (Horizontal) completed the large earthen dining facility pad and started excavation of the storm water retention pond.
  • Months of work takes shape as an 880-acre area in Regional Command-North, Afghanistan is officially dedicated and named Camp John Pratt, after fallen U.S. Army Chief Warrant Officer 5 John C. Pratt, formerly of the 12th Combat Aviation Brigade, Aug. 14. The camp has been allocated to serve as an alternative egress staging area as the stream of troops and equipment being removed from the country increases.
  • The 12th Combat Aviation Brigade honored Chief Warrant Officer 5 John C. Pratt, the brigade’s first senior warrant officer, in a ceremony Friday renaming the headquarters building here for the fallen aviator.
  • In September, NATO Support Agency officials said Poo Pond – Kandahar Airfield’s iconic black water retention pond for the majority of the past decade – would be drained throughout autumn and eventually be retired because it was no longer needed in conjunction with the opening of the state-of-the-art Deep South Waste Water Treatment Plant in the southwest corner of the airfield.
However, because the commercial cooking grease and oil separator unit is not yet on line at the Deep South plant and can’t process the commercial cooking grease and oil waste generated on KAF, Poo Pond’s life has been extended.

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