News Icon

News: Combat aid station displays medical skills during 'controlled chaos'

Story by Sgt. Austan OwenSmall RSS IconSubscriptions Icon

Combat aid station displays medical skills during 'controlled chaos' Sgt. Austan Owen

Medics, doctors and combat lifesaver qualified soldiers, 2nd Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, treat numerous simulated injuries during a mass casualty exercise at the National Training Center Nov. 8. The wounded role-players arrived from all across Forward Operating Base Denver after a simulated mortar attack. The caregivers provided aid to the wounded during the "controlled chaos."

FORT IRWIN, Calif. – The medics knew they were going to be busy when the ground shook and the earsplitting blasts of incoming mortars struck Forward Operating Base Denver. The concussions signaled an attack that would leave scores of mock wounded scattered about the FOB. The attack was launched at the beginning of dinner meal service during the FOB’s most populated time of the day.

Medics and combat lifesaver qualified soldiers took charge of the scene during a mass casualty training exercise, treating and collecting the wounded for transport to C Company, 2nd Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division’s, aid station. The wounded soldiers arrived at the hospital in droves. Against the chaos of the scene, they were organized into categories according to the severity of their wounds and treated for their injuries.

The brigade’s aid station can provide echelon two treatment for wounds up to minor surgery on-site. The unit provides care to stabilize severely injured patients until a medical evacuation can arrive and transport the wounded for further treatment, said Staff Sgt. Ramon A. Reyes, treatment non-commissioned officer in charge, C Company, 2nd Brigade Support Battalion, 2nd Bde, 2nd ID.

The combat trainers at the NTC designed the scenario to overwhelm the hospital and test the unit’s reaction to the stress.

“We conduct a lot of rehearsals to plan and develop a mass casualty plan in case of an event like this,” said 1st Sgt. Douglas Wallace, C Company, 2nd BSB, 2nd Bde, 2nd ID.

“The whole purpose of this is that the CTs are going to push us to the limits,” said Maj. John M. Csokmay, a physician attached to C Company, “They are going to stress our resources and our staff to see how we respond.”

The patients flowed into the hospital carried by soldiers, delivered in four litter ambulances and in the back of cargo trucks. Medics and CLS qualified soldiers arrived from across the FOB to assist in any way they could.

“It definitely is organized chaos,” said Csokmay, “While it looks like everyone is running in different directions, any given individual knows what their job is from carrying litters, providing first aid, triaging patients to getting evacuations set up.”

“Professionals practice until they can’t get it wrong,” said Pfc. Diana Deaiman, a medic with C Company, 2nd BSB, 2nd Bde, 2nd ID, originally from Austin, Texas. “I knew what I needed to do.”

The training scenario took on a surreal appearance as the mock wounded arrived through the smoke, the dust and the cover of darkness. Simulated patients screaming in agony presented very realistic conditions.

“The stress that they’re pushing at the NTC, actually getting role-players with very real looking trauma, will help the medics downrange,” said Spc. Elijah Allman, medic with C Company, 2nd BSB, 2nd Bde, 2nd ID, “They will think to themselves, ‘I’ve seen something like this before that’s very lifelike’ and they won’t freeze up, then they will be able to help.”

“For a medical company this is what we are preparing for, the ultimate mass casualty event,” said Sgt. 1st Class Thomas Sherrod, Newark, N.J., treatment platoon sergeant for C Company, 2nd BSB, 2nd Bde, 2nd ID, “We hope it never happens; we know it potentially will happen, and we just have to prepare for it.”

After the exercise was completed, the injured role-players left the tents to the doctors and medics. The unit’s mass casualty plan had worked. At the end of the night C Company finished treating about 30 simulated casualties and two minor real-world injuries without missing a beat.


Connected Media
ImagesCombat aid station...
Spc. Eijah Allman (left), medic, and Maj. Wes Theurer...
ImagesCombat aid station...
Doctors and medics, C Company, 2nd Brigade Support...
ImagesCombat aid station...
Pfc. Diana Dearman (left) and Spc. Catherine Lee, medics...
ImagesCombat aid station...
Doctors and medics, C Company, 2nd Brigade Support...
ImagesCombat aid station...
Medics, doctors and combat lifesaver qualified soldiers,...


Web Views
57
Downloads
1

Podcast Hits
0



Public Domain Mark
This work, Combat aid station displays medical skills during 'controlled chaos', by SGT Austan Owen, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:11.08.2011

Date Posted:11.10.2011 23:15

Location:FORT IRWIN, CA, USGlobe

Options

  • Army
  • Marines
  • Navy
  • Air Force
  • Coast Guard
  • National Guard

HOLIDAY GREETINGS

SELECT A HOLIDAY:

VIDEO ON DEMAND

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Youtube
  • Flickr