News Icon

News: NFL Continues Military Partnership at Super Bowl

Story by Sgt. 1st Class Michael J. CardenSmall RSS IconSubscriptions Icon

WASHINGTON - From Air Force fighter jet flyovers to Army parachutists dropping in at halftime, the U.S. military and the National Football League have shared more than 40 years of Super Bowl history.

That tradition continues this week during the Super Bowl XLV festivities in North Texas. The Pittsburgh Steelers are playing for their second Super Bowl win in three years as they face the Green Bay Packers at Cowboys Stadium, Feb. 6.

NFL players in the area were scheduled to spend yesterday afternoon greeting troops returning from combat tours in Iraq and Afghanistan at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport. Tonight at 8, NFL players and hall-of-famers in Texas for the game will connect with deployed troops for the annual NFL Charities Super Bowl Celebrity Bowling Classic. The interactive broadcast will connect the celebrities with wounded servicemembers recovering at a military hospital in Afghanistan.

Ten wounded warriors recovering in San Diego and Washington, D.C., will travel to North Texas courtesy of NFL Experience. The troops will participate in the Rehabbing with the Troops program and work out with NFL players, Feb. 4. The troops were selected for finishing in the top 10 of the season-long program, which used EA Active NFL training camps to help wounded troops with their rehabilitation.

Also on Feb. 4, several sevice members will participate in NFL commissioner Roger Goodell's news conference. About 150 children from Fort Hood, Texas, will participate in an NFL youth football clinic hosted by the I'm Not a Hero Foundation.

Fort Hood service members will attend several other Super Bowl events as special guests of the NFL throughout the week, including the NFL Experience and the Tazon Latino Flag Football game today, VH1's Pepsi Fan Jam tomorrow, Univision Pepsi Fan Jam, Feb. 4, and a special concert Feb. 5 hosted by Country Music Television.

The NFL will cap off the week with a Super Bowl party throughout the game at Joint Base Meyer-Henderson Hall, Va., for wounded warriors recovering at Walter Reed Army Medical Center here.

Throughout the years, the Super Bowl has become one of the most highly rated televised events of the year. This year, Super Bowl XLV will be broadcast to more than 230 countries to a potential worldwide audience of more than 1 billion viewers, including service members serving in Iraq and Afghanistan.


Web Views
123
Downloads
1

Podcast Hits
0



Public Domain Mark
This work, NFL Continues Military Partnership at Super Bowl, by SFC Michael J. Carden, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:02.02.2011

Date Posted:02.02.2011 15:25

Location:WASHINGTON, DC, USGlobe

More Like This

  • KHOWST PROVINCE, Afghanistan—Super Bowl fever was alive and well deep in the interior of Afghanistan, Feb. 6. The Camp Clark dining facility, known throughout Regional Command East for going above and beyond for its soldiers, threw an elaborate Super Bowl party to rival anything in the states.
  • Underneath the Red number 40 Jersey at the Pat Tillman USO center on Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, four ProBowl NFL players met with hundreds of Military service members as part of a USO tour, March 5.
  • Well dressed, clean shaven, well-spoken and wearing a broad smile, for the non-football fan the five-foot-11- inch, 178-pound Texan didn’t fit the burly NFL football player and Super Bowl champion image. But the chunky, gold and diamond ring he wore gave it away.
  • Football fans at Camp Atterbury Joint Maneuver Training Center had unique visitors Feb. 2, as seven NFL football players from various teams and a group of Indianapolis Colts cheerleaders made an appearance for the NFL Salute to Service Military Appreciation event here.

News Tags

Options

  • Army
  • Marines
  • Navy
  • Air Force
  • Coast Guard
  • National Guard

HOLIDAY GREETINGS

SELECT A HOLIDAY:

VIDEO ON DEMAND

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Youtube
  • Flickr