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Balloons Away!

The SkySat system is carried on a 10- to 12-foot latex balloon filled with hydrogen to lift the 12-pound payload of the actual system. Soldiers and civilian leaders observed and took part in a hands-on demonstration of the system, which can be launched from virtually anywhere using the portable launch bag, even in winds as high as 40 knots.



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Public Domain Mark
This work, Balloons Away!, by SSG Matthew Winstead, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:07.17.2012

Date Posted:07.23.2012 18:44

Photo ID:630551

VIRIN:120717-A-#####-001

Resolution:768x1156

Size:344.88 KB

Location:JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON, AK, USGlobe

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  • Chris Coffman, a field operations specialist with Space Data Corporation, prepares a free-floating Combat SkySat military retransmission platform for launch as a tethered Combat SkySat military retransmission platform is launched by soldiers assigned to 1st Battalion (Airborne), 501st Infantry Regiment, behind him at Forward Operating Base Sparta on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 9, 2013. The unique SkySat system has a tethered and free-floating version, can serve as a repeater for hand-held military communications equipment, which has a normal range of about two kilometers and expands that to approximately 500 miles, and can be set up and rapidly operational on the battlefield. (U.S. Air Force photo by Justin Connaher/Released)
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Associated News

US Army Alaska hosts equipment test in JBER skies

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