Coast Guard responds to disabled sailboat 300 miles off Cape Henry, Va.

U.S. Coast Guard District 5
Story by Petty Officer 1st Class Brandyn Hill

Date: 01.14.2014
Posted: 01.14.2014 16:59
News ID: 119154

PORTSMOUTH, Va. — The Coast Guard is responding to a disabled sailboat with four people aboard in the Atlantic Ocean Tuesday approximately 300 miles east of Cape Henry, Va.<br /> <br /> A representative from the manufacturer of the Be Good Too, a 42-foot sailboat, contacted the Coast Guard at approximately 1:30 p.m. Monday, reporting the Be Good Too was disabled and adrift during its transit from New York to the British Virgin Islands.<br /> <br /> "Last night we spoke with the Be Good Too crew and based on the forecasted weather, they decided they were willing to depart their vessel around 5 p.m. Monday," said Matthew Brooks, a Coast Guard 5th District Command Center command duty officer. "We did not want to conduct a transfer at night due to the risk of the mission and the fact that the crew was not in immediate distress."<br /> <br /> District watchstanders determined that responding with a Coast Guard cutter was not feasible due to the distance offshore. Therefore, Coast Guard personnel contacted U.S. Fleet Forces personnel requesting a Navy vessel to assist the Coast Guard in their response. The USS Ross, a 505-foot guided missle destroyer, diverted course to provide a refueling platform for a Coast Guard helicopter.<br /> <br /> District watchstanders dispatched crews aboard a Jayhawk helicopter and an HC-130 Hercules aircraft from Coast Guard Air Station Elizabeth City, N.C., at approximately 6:20 a.m. to assist.<br /> <br /> The Jayhawk crew landed on the USS Ross to refuel at approximately 7:30 a.m. and then proceeded to the location of the Be Good Too.<br /> <br /> The Jayhawk crew completed their hoist of the four people aboard the sailboat at approximately 9:15 a.m., refueled aboard the USS Ross and took them to the air station.