Maintenance window scheduled to begin at February 14th 2200 est. until 0400 est. February 15th

(e.g. yourname@email.com)

Forgot Password?

    Defense Visual Information Distribution Service Logo

    OKINAWAN MAYOR SHARES HIS THOUGHTS THROUGH BOOK READING AT KINSER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL / キンザー小学校で浦添市長が読み聞かせ ・・・ 伝える思い

    OKINAWAN MAYOR SHARES HIS THOUGHTS THROUGH BOOK READING AT KINSER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL / キンザー小学校で浦添市長が読み聞かせ ・・・  伝える思い

    Photo By Yoshie Makiyama | Urasoe City Mayor Tetsuji Matsumoto reads to 31 second grade children at Kinser...... read more read more

    OKINAWA, JAPAN

    05.09.2024

    Story by Yoshie Makiyama 

    Marine Corps Installations Pacific

    People can learn many things through books. You acquire logical thinking, memory, and information processing skills while gaining new knowledge and a wide range of values. Above all, reading enriches your imagination.

    Because of such beliefs, a lot of schools in Japan give children time for book-reading, whether students themselves read or someone else reads to them. In many schools, volunteers—mostly parents of the students—come to school to read books to children.

    Tetsuji Matsumoto, mayor of Urasoe City, was one such parent who volunteered to read books at his children’s school when they were school age.

    “When I became mayor, I thought I was lucky because I could now go and read books at not just my children’s school, but also all 11 (elementary) schools in the city,” said Matsumoto.

    Ayano Shimojo, a Japanese culture teacher at Kinser Elementary School, said, “After I heard about the mayor reading books to the local children at schools, I wished he would come to our school and read a book to our children.”

    Ever since, Shimojo has looked for an opportunity, and when the time finally came in March 2023, during the National Reading Month to celebrate Dr. Seuss’ birthday, she invited Matsumoto to be a guest reader. He read a book called “The Giving Tree” to the fourth graders for the first time in English.

    On Feb. 7, 2024, Matsumoto again appeared in the library at Kinser Elementary School. He had a book in his hand, and an audience of 31 children from the second grade waiting for story time.

    “American children are very energetic,” said Matsumoto. He thinks both Japanese and American children listen attentively, but the atmosphere is different. This year he was invited on “World Read Aloud Day” in which people celebrate oral forms of storytelling as the earliest way of preserving human knowledge, insight, and creativity. Matsumoto chose the same book, “The Giving Tree” to read for children.

    After introducing himself, Matsumoto began reading and, at the end of each page, he stopped and asked questions to the children. Some questions were about the words, sentences, and illustrations in the book, but some questioned the reasoning of the characters’ actions and what the children thought about it. Matsumoto said that he felt the children understood what he was trying to convey from their responses.

    “He asked questions that the children would be interested in and wanted to engage in,” said Shimojo. “Because the story is short, the children of that age can follow it and read it together.” She said that it touches the children's hearts and minds, especially having a mayor come down to their level and teach them important things, while interacting with them in such a way.

    “The Giving Tree,” published 60 years ago, is a story about an apple tree and a boy. From the surface, it looks like the tree is always giving and the boy is always taking, and there is no give-and-take relationship there, but Matsumoto sees it in a positive way. In the final pages, both the tree, as just a stump which has nothing, and the boy, who aged, meet once again. The tree is not happy at that moment because it has nothing to give him but the boy tells it all he wants is "a quiet place to sit and rest" and makes it happy.

    At the end of the story, Matsumoto told the children that sharing what you can give makes everyone happy and he wants to be like the tree. Although the tree, which has nothing left at the end, he said, just keeps on giving, it can make other people around it happy and it becomes happy as well.

    Matsumoto stated that his motto is “Happiness only becomes real when shared.”

    According to Adrienne Arden, a school librarian at Kinser Elementary, the book has lots of different elements like happiness, sadness, loneliness, and growing up. “It is a day to not only read aloud and listen to books, but it is also about telling stories, and by the mayor sharing with us, he is telling a small part of his story and sharing his life with our students,” said Arden. “I believe he wanted students to have a giving heart and to be good to one another like how the tree was to the boy.”

    Arden hopes that connecting students to the host nation like this helps the students think about their community on a larger scale than just their family, their houses, and the base. Arden expressed that exposing children to and living in different cultures will help children see themselves as part of a larger global community.

     人は本を通じて様々なことを学ぶ。新しい知識を得ながら論理的思考力や記憶力、情報処理能力を人々は身につけ、幅広い価値観を持つことができる。そして、何よりも、読書は、人々の想像力を豊かにするという。

     このような考えから、日本の多くの学校では、自分で読むにせよ、他の誰かが読むにせよ、子どもたちに本に親しむ時間を与えている。通常、多くの学校で、生徒の保護者を中心としたボランティアが、学校に子どもたちに本を読み聞かせるためにやってくる。

     浦添市の松本哲治市長もそのような保護者の一人で、自身の子供たちが小学生の頃、学校で本を読むボランティアをしていた。子供たちが大きくなって市長になった後も、彼はまだ小学生への本の読み聞かせを続けたいと考えていた。

     「市長になったとき、自分の子どもたちの学校だけでなく、市内にある11の小学校で本を読むことができるようになったので、自分はラッキーだと思いました」と市長は話す。

     キンザー小学校で日本文化を教えている下條綾乃さんは、「市長が地元の学校で子どもたちに読み聞かせをしていると聞いて、私たちの学校にも来て子どもたちに本を読んでほしいと思いました」と語る。

     それ以来、下條さんは市長を学校に招く機会を探していた。そして、 2023年3月、 ついに、彼女はアメリカの絵本作家ドクター・スースの誕生日を祝う全米読書月間で、松本市長をゲストとして招くことに成功した。英語が話せる市長は4年生に「おおきな木」という本を初めて英語で読み聞かせた。

     2024年2月7日、市長は再びキンザー小学校の図書館に現れた。彼の手には本が握られ、31人の2年生の子供たちが読み聞かせの時間を待っていた。

     「アメリカの子供たちはとても元気がいいですね」と市長。日本の子供もアメリカの子供も熱心に聞いてくれるが、雰囲気が違うと市長は言う。今年は、読み書きができる喜びを祝う「世界音読の日」に招かれた。松本市長は子どもたちに読み聞かせをするために、再び「おおきな木」を選んだ。

     松本市長は自己紹介の後、本を読み始め、ページを終えるごとに手を止めて子どもたちに質問を投げかけた。本の中の言葉や文章、挿絵についての質問もあったが、登場人物の行動の理由やそれについて子どもたちがどう思うかを問う質問もあった。市長は、子どもたちの反応から、彼が伝えようとしていることを理解していると感じたという。

     「子どもたちが興味を持ち、取り組みたくなるような質問をしてくれていました。物語が短いので、この年齢の子どもたちも一緒に文を追って読むことができます」と下條さんは言う。彼女は、市長が子供たちの目線まで降りてきて、彼らと触れ合いながら大切なことを教えてくれることは、子供たちの心に響くのではないだろうかと考える。

     60年前に出版された「おおきな木」は、リンゴの木と少年の物語である。表面から見ると、木は常に与え、少年は常に奪う、そこにギブ・アンド・テイクの関係はないように見えるが、市長はそれを肯定的にとらえている。最後のページで、何も持たないただの切り株としての木と、歳をとった少年が再び出会うが、そのとき木は少年に与えるものが何もないので幸せではなかったが、少年は木に「座って休める静かな場所」が欲しいだけだと伝え、木を幸せにする。

     物語の最後に松本市長は子どもたちに、与えられるものを分かち合うことがみんなを幸せにすることであり、自身もこの木のようになりたいと語った。最後には何も残らない木だが、ただ与え続けることで、周りの人を幸せにすることができ、自分も幸せになるのだと。

     市長は、「幸せは分かち合ってこそ本物になる 」をモットーに掲げている。

     キンザー小学校の司書、エイドリアン・アーデンさんによると、この本には幸せ、悲しみ、孤独、成長など様々な要素が盛り込まれているという。「この日は音読したり本を聴いたりするだけでなく、物語を語る日でもあり、松本市長が私たちと(本を)分かち合うことで、彼は自分の物語のほんの一部を語り、彼自身の人生を生徒たちと分かち合っているのです」とアーデンさんは話す。「彼は生徒たちに、木が少年にしたように、与える心を持ち、お互いによくすることを望んだのだと思います。」

     アーデンさんは、このように生徒たちが受け入れ国とつながることで、自分たちの家族や家、基地だけでなく、より大きなスケールで自らが住む地域社会について考えるようになることを願っている。彼女は、子供たちが異文化に触れ、異文化の中で生活することで、自分たちをより大きな地球規模の共同体の一部であると考えるようになるのではと語った。

    LEAVE A COMMENT

    NEWS INFO

    Date Taken: 05.09.2024
    Date Posted: 05.24.2024 03:10
    Story ID: 471938
    Location: OKINAWA, JP

    Web Views: 21
    Downloads: 0

    PUBLIC DOMAIN