Maintenance window scheduled to begin at February 14th 2200 est. until 0400 est. February 15th

(e.g. yourname@email.com)

Forgot Password?

    Defense Visual Information Distribution Service Logo

    MARINES IMMERSE IN JAPANESE CULTURE WITH LOCAL CHILDREN FROM NORTH TO SOUTH / 北から南から、海兵隊員、地元の子どもたちとボランティアで日本文化に浸る

    MARINES IMMERSE IN JAPANESE CULTURE WITH LOCAL CHILDREN FROM NORTH TO SOUTH / 北から南から、海兵隊員、地元の子どもたちとボランティアで日本文化に浸る

    Photo By Yoshie Makiyama | A Marine, given the role of oni, demon, approaches children during the Setsubun event...... read more read more

    OKINAWA, JAPAN

    05.09.2024

    Story by Yoshie Makiyama 

    Marine Corps Installations Pacific

    Marines stationed in Okinawa are spread out across the island, from Camp Gonsalves, home to the Jungle Warfare Training Center in the north, down to Camp Schwab in Nago City, Ie Shima training facility, Camp Hansen, Camps Courtney and McTureous, Camps Foster and Lester, Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, and all the way to Camp Kinser, the most southern base, in Urasoe City.

    Their purpose is to secure and enhance their capabilities, and strengthen the alliance between Japan and the U.S. However, Marines also spend their time volunteering in neighboring communities, doing beach cleanups, language lessons, and other community exchanges.

    In February 2024, six Marines and a Sailor had a new experience when they participated in volunteer activities. They were a group from Camps Schwab and Kinser who joined a traditional Japanese event for Setsubun in a neighboring community.

    Setsubun originally has the meaning of the division of the seasons, but also is an event to drive away “oni (demons),” representing bad fortunes, as people throw roasted soy beans at them. Setsubun takes place before the first day of spring on the lunar calendar. This year it was on Feb. 3.

    Camp Schwab

    Maiko Kamiya, Camp Schwab community relations specialist, and a few volunteers visited a local nursery school in Motobu Town located in the western part of Nago City, on Feb. 2, 2024.

    The nursery school began having events together with service members in 2023, when they celebrated Halloween and Christmas together. According to the head of the nursery school, the exchange with Marines and Sailors from Camp Schwab started when a former student who attended the day care over 20 years ago offered the events with service members to the school.

    Three Marines were introduced to the children, ages zero to five, and sat together while the children sang and listened to the story of Setsubun. Two Marines then disappeared to disguise as oni, while one interacted with the children.

    Once the older age groups went outside, they began throwing soybeans at demons built out of boxes. As the children practiced their aim, a teacher appeared disguised as oni. The students recognized their teacher, but were surprised when two more onis joined the teacher. Since the children did not know the service members, their responses were a mix of freezing in fear and bravely throwing beans.

    Lance Cpl. Tucker J. Miller, assigned to 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, currently with 4th Marine Regiment, who came to Okinawa as part of the Unit Deployment Program last August, participated in a volunteer activity for the first time because he heard that it would be around children and he is an oldest brother with many siblings. He was given the role of oni.

    After being chased by small children, Miller laughed and said that the children had good aim and good intuition. “They always go for the head, but it was awesome. It was a lot of fun,” said Miller with a big smile on his face.

    “This (Setsubun event with service members) is actually our first attempt,” said a nursery school head. “Having this kind of exchange, interacting with foreigners, is a very good thing. Marines treated the children in a normal way without much hesitation. I was surprised that children actually approached them and leaned closer to them. It was a great success.”

    Camp Kinser

    On Feb. 3, another group of volunteers, four Marines and Sailors, visited two children’s centers in Urasoe City, near Camp Kinser. Participants were all with the Single Marine Program of Marine Corps Community Services Okinawa. Maki Eda, Morale, Welfare and Recreation program aide, Camp Kinser, MCCS, and Ichino Doshida, community relations specialist of Camp Kinser, invited them for the Setsubun event as a cultural exchange.

    “I've been dying to get out here and do some volunteer opportunities with kids in Japan,” exclaimed Hospital Corpsman Third Class Kristin McKenzie, Combat Logistics Regiment 37 of 3d Marine Logistics Group, and a former elementary school physical education teacher prior to joining the U.S. Navy. She participated in a game similar to tag and said that she was happy to have a chance to interact with Japanese children.

    Camp Kinser SMP and Morinoko and Miyagikko children’s centers have engaged in the various exchange programs for seven years. Once a month, Marines and Sailors visit Miyagikko at night to play sports with junior and high school students. Lance Cpl. Ramos P. Sebastian, 3rd Sustainment Group (Experimental), 3d MLG, who participated in the night volunteer program a week before, expected to see familiar faces among the children, but this was a younger group.

    In Morinoko, the service members listened to a story about Setsubun and played games with the children. Then they moved to the Miyagikko center, where the staff handed two Marines oni inflatable costumes and gave instruction on how to do the role of onis. While the children played outside, two onis ran out from two different corners and started chasing the children. Paper balls were set on the ground for beans and children were to ward off the onis with them.

    “It was pretty fun,” said Lance Cpl. Am Aliwis, 3d Maintenance Battalion, 3d MLG, while catching his breath after the chase. “I feel very lucky to be here because not a lot of people get to experience this as a pretty fun way to get to know the community around Okinawa.”

    One eight year-old at Miyagikko center expected the staff to be disguised as an oni, but figured out that the onis were foreigners. Although she was scared by the strangers, she said that it was fun to throw beans, paper balls, at them, and she was happy that she did not get caught after her bean hit one of the onis while being chased.

    “It was a huge success!” said Nana Toda, director of the Miyagikko Children’s Center. “We got new costumes and wanted Marines to try them on because they were taller. We wanted to surprise children by not telling who would do onis, and see how they would react.”

    Toda smiled and said that it was interesting to see that the children were confused but still throwing their beans and running away, and at the same time, the Marines disguised as onis also looked lost at first but threw the beans back and chased the children.

    After the chase outside, the volunteers were served Japanese traditional food for the event, Eho-maki, a rolled sushi wrapped with dried seaweed paper. You face “Eho,” the lucky direction of the year, and make a wish while eating it without talking. On average, Eho-maki are about 8-10 centimeters (3-4 inches) long. It is not usually cut into bite size pieces, as it is meant to bring good fortune.

    “I didn't know how exactly I was supposed to eat it, so I just stuffed it all in my mouth and just started chewing and it was very hard to chew and swallow at the same time,” said Aliwis. “It's very different from American culture, but trying it out for the first time is very cool."

    Aliwis said that it was a very informative experience. He suggested that more service members get out of the barracks and engage in volunteer activities, which give them an opportunity to become a part of the culture. He stated that if you do not explore outside, you may miss chances. “I'm glad that my friend dragged me along and invited me.”

     沖縄に駐留する米海兵隊員は、北は北部訓練場のあるキャンプ・ゴンザルベスから始まり、名護市のキャンプ・シュワブ、伊江島補助飛行場、キャンプ・ハンセン、キャンプ・コートニー&マクトリアス、キャンプ・フォスター&レスター、普天間航空基地、そして最南端の海兵隊基地になる浦添市のキャンプ・キンザーまで、 沖縄全土に広がり活動している。

     彼らは、在日海兵隊の能力を確保・強化し、日米同盟を強固にするために存在する。しかし、隊員らはまた、近隣地区でのボランティア活動も積極的に行っており、海岸清掃や語学レッスンなどの地域交流にも力を入れている。

     2024年2月、6人の海兵隊員と1人の海軍兵がボランティア活動に加わり、新しい経験をした。キャンプ・シュワブとキャンプ・キンザーから集まった隊員らは、それぞれの近隣地域で行われた日本の伝統的な節分行事に参加した。

     節分は本来、季節の分かれ目という意味もあるが、同時に、人々が炒った大豆を災いを表す「鬼」に投げつけることで、厄を追い払う行事でもある。節分は旧暦の立春の前に行われる。今年は2月3日だった。

    キャンプ・シュワブ

     2024年2月2日、シュワブ基地から神谷真衣子渉外官と数名のボランティアが、名護市西部に位置する本部町の保育所を訪問した。

     この保育所では、2023年にハロウィンとクリスマスを共に祝ったことをきっかけに、隊員たちとイベントを行うようになった。同保育所の所長によると、キャンプ・シュワブの海兵隊員や海軍兵との交流は、20年以上前に同保育所に通っていた元園児が隊員らとの交流話を持ちかけたことから始まったという。

     3人の海兵隊員が0歳から5歳までの子どもたちに紹介され、子どもたちが歌ったり節分の話を聞いたりしている間、一緒に座った。その後、2人の海兵隊員が鬼に変装するために姿を消し、1人が子どもたちと交流した。

     年長組が外に出ると、箱で作った作り物の鬼に大豆を投げ始めた。子供たちが狙いを定めて練習していると、鬼に変装した先生が登場。彼らはその鬼が先生だと気づいたが、園庭の隅からさらに2体の大きな姿の鬼が先生に加わると愕然となった。隊員らの参加を知らない子供たちは、恐怖で固まったり、勇敢に豆を投げたりと様々だった。

     昨年8月、第2海兵連隊第2大隊所属で部隊交代計画の一環として沖縄入りし、現在第4海兵連隊所属のタッカー・J・ミラー上等兵は、子どもたちが相手だからと、初めてボランティア活動に参加した。鬼役を任された。

     「彼らはいつも頭を狙ってくるけど、最高だったよ。とても楽しかった」と満面の笑みを浮かべたミラー上等兵は、兄弟の多い長兄である。

     所長は、「実際にこれ(節分イベントを隊員らとすること)は初めての試みです。外国人と触れ合う、このような交流はすごく良いことだと思います。隊員らは、あまり抵抗なく普通に子どもたちに接してくれました。実際に子どもたちから彼らに近づき、寄り添っていったのには驚きました。大成功でした」と話した。

    キャンプ・キンザー

     2月3日、4人の海兵隊員と海軍兵からなる別のボランティア・グループが、キャンプ・キンザーがある浦添市の2つの児童センターを訪問した。参加者は全員、海兵隊コミュニティサービス沖縄のキャンプ・キンザー・シングル・マリン・プログラム(通称SMP)に所属する独身隊員のメンバーだった。同プログラム補助職の江田真紀さんと、キンザー基地の土信田一乃渉外官が、文化交流として彼らに節分行事への参加を呼びかけた。

     第3海兵後方支援群第37戦闘連隊に所属し、米海軍に入隊する前は小学校の体育教師だったクリスティン・マッケンジー3等衛生兵は、「日本の子どもたちと交流するボランティア活動がしたくてたまりませんでした」と声を弾ませた。彼女は鬼ごっこに似たゲームに参加し、日本の子供たちと触れ合える機会を持てたことを喜んだ。

     キンザーSMPと森の子・宮城っ子児童センターは、7年前からさまざまな交流プログラムに取り組んでいる。また、毎月一度、彼らは夜間に宮城っ子児童センターを訪れ、中高生とスポーツを楽しんだりする。1週間前にこの夜の交流プログラムに参加した第3海兵後方支援群第3維持グループのラモス・P・セバスチャン上等兵は、子どもたちの中に見知った顔がいるだろうと期待していたが、この日の参加者は5歳から12歳の子どもたちと数人の中学生だった。

     森の子児童センターでは、隊員らは節分の話を聞いたり、子どもたちとゲームをしたりした。その後、宮城っ子児童センターに移動し、スタッフから2人の海兵隊員に鬼の着ぐるみが手渡され、鬼役の指導が行われた。子どもたちが外で遊んでいる間、2匹の鬼が別々のコーナーから飛び出してきて、子どもたちを追いかけ始める。地面に豆の代わりに紙玉が置かれ、子どもたちはそれで鬼を追い払うというものだ。

     追いかけっこを終えて一息つきながら、第3海兵後方支援群第3整備大隊のアム・アリウィス上等兵は「とても楽しかったです。沖縄の地域社会を知るための手段として、このような楽しい経験をできる人は多くないので、ここに参加できてとてもラッキーだと思います」と笑った。

     宮城っ子児童センターに通っている8歳の子どもは、スタッフが鬼に変装していると予想していたが、鬼は外国人だとわかったそう。見知らぬ人たちに怯えながらも、豆まきは楽しいと言い、追いかけられながらも豆を鬼に当てられ、しかも捕まらなかったことが嬉しかったと話した。

     「もう大成功じゃないですか?」と、同センターの戸田奈菜センター長は目を輝かせた。「新しいコスチュームを用意したのですが、背が高い海兵隊員に着てもらいたかったんです。誰が鬼をやるかわからない、子供たちを驚かせたかったし、反応を見たかったんです。」

     戸田センター長は、児童らが当惑しながらも豆を投げて逃げる姿や、また、鬼に変装した海兵隊員らが最初は戸惑っている様子だったが、豆を投げ返して子供たちを追いかけていたことも印象的だったと笑顔で語った。

     追いかけっこの後は、ボランティアたちに日本の伝統的行事食である恵方巻きが振る舞われた。恵方巻きは、その年の吉方位である「恵方」を向いて、願い事をしながら無言で食べる。 恵方巻きの長さは平均8~10cmほどだが、通常、縁結びの意味もあり、一口大に切ることはない。

     「どうやって食べたらいいのかわからなくて、口に全部詰め込んで噛み始めたんですが、噛むのと飲み込むのを同時にやるのはとても大変でした」とアリウィス上等兵。「アメリカの文化とはまったく違うけれど、こういった初めての挑戦はとても素晴らしいことです」と話した。

     アリウィス上等兵はこの日をとてもためになる体験だったとし、もっと多くの隊員が兵舎から出て、文化の一部となる機会を与えるボランティア活動に参加するべきだと言い、外を探検しなければ、せっかくのチャンスを逃してしまうかもしれないと述べた。「友達に引っ張られ、連れてこられてよかったです」とアリウィス上等兵からは笑みがこぼれた。

    NEWS INFO

    Date Taken: 05.09.2024
    Date Posted: 05.24.2024 03:15
    Story ID: 471929
    Location: OKINAWA, JP

    Web Views: 28
    Downloads: 0

    PUBLIC DOMAIN