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Video: Suicide Prevention PSA

Video by Laura Boyd, Fred Holly and Stacy Rzepka


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The theme of this year's suicide prevention month is 'A healthy force is a ready force'. Every Screaming Eagle is physically and mentally strong, which makes us tough, resilient, and victorious in every situation. But part of being strong is also having the strength to know when you need to ask for help, and going to talk to someone who can help you work through issues. You wouldn't leave a buddy alone in combat; make sure you don't leave your battle buddies alone at home.


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Public Domain Mark
This work, Suicide Prevention PSA, by Laura Boyd, Fred Holly and Stacy Rzepka, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:10.30.2012

Date Posted:12.18.2012 11:39AM

Category:PSA

Video ID:193695

VIRIN:121030-A-#####-233

Filename:DOD_100670017

Length:00:02:02

Location:FORT CAMPBELL, KY, USGlobe

More Like This

  • Sgt. Mellanie Cadwell, a Master Resiliency Trainer from the 86th Combat Support Hospital, and Fred Holly, the audiovisualist for Blanchfield Army Community Hospital, produced this Suicide Prevention video to show the many different angles of suicide.

Outside of the opening statement and the closing statement, the video is not scripted.  The stories shared are real personal stories, lending credibility and sincerity to the video.

The individuals who were interviewed showed unique perspectives on suicide through their personal stories. One attempted suicide while she was a military spouse while another was just a child when his mother attempted suicide. A medical provider talks about suicide within her ranks and a battle buddy speaks up about the effects of suicide within the unit.

No profession or rank is exempt for the dark reaches of suicide.  It affects everyone, from the person with the suicidal ideations to the friends and family left behind.  It's not a final answer, instead it generates many more questions. In the aftermath in a death by suicide, we experience confusion, anger, frustration and the never ending question 'Why?' circling in the minds of everyone that was affected.

You and your family are important to your unit, the Army and the Nation.  You are a part of a team, a bigger Army family who will reach out to you in times of need.  This Army Family is stronger when everyone practices safety measures at work, at home and in daily activities. We are stronger when Soldiers are healthy and feel valued. If you are having suicidal thoughts or know someone who is in crisis and needs emotional support, remember ACE: Ask, Care and Escort. Don't leave anyone alone in a critical time. Care for them and escort them to professional help. If you or someone you know needs help, call the Military Crisis Hotline at 1-800-273-TALK.
  • [TSgt Cunningham] The Flight Equipment Shop is responsible for equipping the pilots with all their proper gear along with the proper training. Pilot survival training is every 40 months or every AEF cycle. It is designed to show the pilot what to do in the event of an unfortunate aircraft mishap.  

[SrA Sadowski] So automatically you’re already sending a signal out and saying you’ve ejected out of the aircraft and that you're coming down. So as you’re coming down from the air, what are some things here in day light that you can kind of be looking out for in the area? 

[Off screen voice] Concealment. 

[SrA Sadowski] When you’re up there you can see a lot further than when you’re on the ground. So you want to look for water if you can see any water areas, if you can see any small villages, you know you’ll want to stay away from that, any roads that you might come across, anything that might help you once you hit the ground. You’ll want to gather up your equipment anything that you need that is necessary/ Your survival kit, try and grab that. It’s going to be all open, so you might want to grab your rucksack, you got the backpack one, you might want to throw over your shoulder. Whatever’s going to help you survive. Keep low, surround your areas, when you cross the road, make sure you try to go cross ways so you’re not looking like you’re going into the side. When you evade from your initial drop zone you’re going to want to go to your EPA which is east but you will also want to go in a zig-zag pattern. You don’t want to go straight there because that’s going to lead them to exactly where you’re going. 

[TSgt Tussing] So you got the 5 phases of evasion we got going on and right now you guys have gone through initial movement. Moving on to the hole up sight. You want to hydrate, take care of yourself. If you got any major injuries, Doc Reynolds will go over briefly a few of the injuries you might occur.  

 [Lt Col Reynolds-off cam] We always used to say airway first, breathing, circulation. So establishing an airway first, well they changed that. They changed the acronym to MARCH. Massive hemorrhage control first then airway then respiration or breathing problems then circulation and “h” is hypothermia, to keep yourself from getting cold. But the bottom line is by teaching the guys to control hemorrhage first, you save a lot more lives. So, like I said that tourniquet is in one of these pockets, its real simple to apply and if you can get that thing on if you’re bleeding massively, you can prevent yourself from bleeding to death. 

[TSgt Tussing] So you’ve taken care of any type of medical issues you might have and hopefully you’ve got yourself hydrated with some of the water that’s in here. In an environment like this, you go this taller vegetation, as you walk through you notice that there’s a lot of, there’s a few swells in here- kind of up and down, you might want to find yourself to be in there and hole up and wait for instructions. So where are those instructions going to come from?  The radio. With that being said for the scenario, we’re going to have you move in a heading of 107 to the next station and you’ll get further instructions from there. 


Remember don’t make a straight line, you’re going to zig-zag, conceal yourself, watch where you step. 

[CMSgt Managhan] We’re going to talk about evasion movement and navigation here. Avoid silhouetting in the sunlight. Movement attracts attention. So move very slowly and with purpose. Of course the whole thing here is don’t ever move if you don’t have to. Any no-light, low-light. Anytime you would not travel at night is? 

 [Off-camera] ?

[CMSgt Managhan] If the terrain is too rough that you’d end up hurting yourself. Look, listen, watch down the road before you move. I’m going to send you on to your recovery site. 

[MSgt LaGrange] We’ve navigated to our recovery site. You’ve been told that at 11 o’clock, 11am that you’re to use your primary signaling device, which is your signal mirror, ok? He’s flashing in a south-southwest direction at 11 o’clock. He’s just received a message on his radio, that he’s to come out in a non-threatening posture, slowly, quietly, walk across the road. Stay low and wait for authentication. Provide pertinent information to them, inform recovery forces of operational developments. Be prepared to be treated as a captive until you’re authenticated.

[TSgt Cunningham-of cam Voice Over] It was a successful day. When a pilot ejection happens you never know where you’re going to be, who you’re going to be with, or what’s going to be around you. The training today will help these pilots throughout their career. Also available in high definition
  • This is what you need to know to... Avoid Being Next!
Wearing a Life Jacket Can Save Your Life - Available in high definition. 
To ensure you survive unexpected slips or falls overboard wear your life jacket, because it buys you time to be rescued. It only takes an adult an average of 60 seconds to drown and on average it takes 10 minutes for a strong swimmer to put on a life jacket after entering the water. If you will not wear it for yourself then wear it for those who love you. Great information on life jackets can be found at www.pfdma.org/.
Never Exceed Your Swimming Abilities or Swim Alone
Regardless of how well you swim you could have to fight for your life due to unexpected conditions such as waves, current, or exhaustion. A fellow swimmer can help you out when you encounter the unexpected. Remember your swimming abilities are likely to decrease with age so don't overdo it.
Alcohol and Water are a Deadly Combination
When underwater and under the influence of alcohol or drugs you can suffer from an inner ear condition (caloric labyrinthitis) that causes you to become disoriented and not know which way is up. Also, boaters can develop "boater's hypnosis" a condition in response to sun, wind, noise, vibration and motion which causes fatigue and slows your reaction time. Combining that condition with alcohol or drugs greatly reduces your coordination, judgment and reaction time, which could lead to deadly consequences. www.boatus.com/seaworthy/magazine/2011/j uly/alcohol.asp
Your Involuntary Gasp Reflex Can Kill You
A sudden unexpected fall into cold water causes an involuntary gasp (or torso) reflex. It takes less than 1⁄2 cup of water in your lungs to drown. Your gasp reflex is delayed when you are under the influence of alcohol or drugs, which can lead to a last breath of water, instead of air. Falls contribute to 19% of all water-related fatalities on Corps-managed waters. www.oregon.gov/OSMB/safety/coldwaterimme rsion.shtml
Proper Rescue of a Person Overboard
Many drowning victims are within 10 feet of safety, having unintentionally entered the water. You should never go near anybody struggling to stay afloat because you could drown too! To help rescue someone extend a pole, stick, line, or clothing to reach them or throw something floatable to them. The "Reach, Throw, Row, Go for Help" rescue method is used to avoid multiple drownings. www.army.mil/article/51402/reach-throw-r ow-dont-go
Drowning is a Silent Killer
An estimated 60% of all drownings are witnessed, because people are unable to identify the four signs of a drowning victim. Signs are head back (bobs up and down above/below the surface), mouth open, no sound and arms outstretched moving simultaneously in an above-the-water, up and down stroke that appears as if they are slapping or playing in the water. http://mariovittone.com/2010/05/154/
Be Aware of Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning
CO is a colorless, odorless gas that can harm and even kill you while you are inside or swimming outside of a boat. CO is lighter than water so it invisibly hovers on the water's surface. Prevent the unexpected by learning more about where CO may accumulate and CO poisoning symptoms.
Take a Boating Course
Learn valuable tips that can help save your life in unexpected situations by taking a NASBLA (National Association of Boating Law Administrators) approved boating safety course. Many insurance companies offer discounts to boating safety course graduates. In addition, many states require a boating class for operators under a certain age. These are offered by the US Coast Guard Auxiliary, U.S. Power Squadron, state agencies, and on-line at www.boatus.org/onlinecourse/default.asp or www.americasboatingcourse.com.
Learn to Swim Well and Practice Floating
Besides wearing a life jacket, learning to swim well is one of your best defenses against drowning. Also, teach those you love and practice simple survival floating skills; remembering how to relax and float when exhausted can save your life. Swimming in natural or open waters is not the same as swimming in a pool. The USA Swimming Foundation works with local partners to offer free swimming lessons. Find a location near you at http://swimfoundation.org/Page.aspx?p....
Watch Your Children
You may not expect your child to reach overboard or turn the boat key to see what might happen so be alert. It takes an average of 20 seconds for a child to drown so always make them wear a life jacket and never take your eyes off of them around water.

www.CorpsLakes.us/AreYouNext
  • This is what you need to know to... Avoid Being Next!
Wearing a Life Jacket Can Save Your Life - Available in high definition. 
To ensure you survive unexpected slips or falls overboard wear your life jacket, because it buys you time to be rescued. It only takes an adult an average of 60 seconds to drown and on average it takes 10 minutes for a strong swimmer to put on a life jacket after entering the water. If you will not wear it for yourself then wear it for those who love you. Great information on life jackets can be found at www.pfdma.org/.
Never Exceed Your Swimming Abilities or Swim Alone
Regardless of how well you swim you could have to fight for your life due to unexpected conditions such as waves, current, or exhaustion. A fellow swimmer can help you out when you encounter the unexpected. Remember your swimming abilities are likely to decrease with age so don't overdo it.
Alcohol and Water are a Deadly Combination
When underwater and under the influence of alcohol or drugs you can suffer from an inner ear condition (caloric labyrinthitis) that causes you to become disoriented and not know which way is up. Also, boaters can develop "boater's hypnosis" a condition in response to sun, wind, noise, vibration and motion which causes fatigue and slows your reaction time. Combining that condition with alcohol or drugs greatly reduces your coordination, judgment and reaction time, which could lead to deadly consequences. www.boatus.com/seaworthy/magazine/2011/j uly/alcohol.asp
Your Involuntary Gasp Reflex Can Kill You
A sudden unexpected fall into cold water causes an involuntary gasp (or torso) reflex. It takes less than 1⁄2 cup of water in your lungs to drown. Your gasp reflex is delayed when you are under the influence of alcohol or drugs, which can lead to a last breath of water, instead of air. Falls contribute to 19% of all water-related fatalities on Corps-managed waters. www.oregon.gov/OSMB/safety/coldwaterimme rsion.shtml
Proper Rescue of a Person Overboard
Many drowning victims are within 10 feet of safety, having unintentionally entered the water. You should never go near anybody struggling to stay afloat because you could drown too! To help rescue someone extend a pole, stick, line, or clothing to reach them or throw something floatable to them. The "Reach, Throw, Row, Go for Help" rescue method is used to avoid multiple drownings. www.army.mil/article/51402/reach-throw-r ow-dont-go
Drowning is a Silent Killer
An estimated 60% of all drownings are witnessed, because people are unable to identify the four signs of a drowning victim. Signs are head back (bobs up and down above/below the surface), mouth open, no sound and arms outstretched moving simultaneously in an above-the-water, up and down stroke that appears as if they are slapping or playing in the water. http://mariovittone.com/2010/05/154/
Be Aware of Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning
CO is a colorless, odorless gas that can harm and even kill you while you are inside or swimming outside of a boat. CO is lighter than water so it invisibly hovers on the water's surface. Prevent the unexpected by learning more about where CO may accumulate and CO poisoning symptoms.
Take a Boating Course
Learn valuable tips that can help save your life in unexpected situations by taking a NASBLA (National Association of Boating Law Administrators) approved boating safety course. Many insurance companies offer discounts to boating safety course graduates. In addition, many states require a boating class for operators under a certain age. These are offered by the US Coast Guard Auxiliary, U.S. Power Squadron, state agencies, and on-line at www.boatus.org/onlinecourse/default.asp or www.americasboatingcourse.com.
Learn to Swim Well and Practice Floating
Besides wearing a life jacket, learning to swim well is one of your best defenses against drowning. Also, teach those you love and practice simple survival floating skills; remembering how to relax and float when exhausted can save your life. Swimming in natural or open waters is not the same as swimming in a pool. The USA Swimming Foundation works with local partners to offer free swimming lessons. Find a location near you at http://swimfoundation.org/Page.aspx?p....
Watch Your Children
You may not expect your child to reach overboard or turn the boat key to see what might happen so be alert. It takes an average of 20 seconds for a child to drown so always make them wear a life jacket and never take your eyes off of them around water.

www.CorpsLakes.us/AreYouNext

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