May the 'force' be with FTAC

Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst
Story by Airman Sean Crowe

Date: 10.19.2012
Posted: 10.19.2012 12:50
News ID: 96445

JOINT BASE MCGUIRE-DIX-LAKEHURST, N.J. - The Oct. 1 through Oct. 9 First Term Airman Center class was the first class to receive security forces augmentee training Oct. 10 through Oct. 11 at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst.

All future FTAC classes will be trained as security forces augmentees to be force multipliers if an elevated force protection condition or natural disaster requires the need of additional security forces. Security forces will now begin training airmen immediately after the six-day FTAC course.

"The initiative is to create a large pool of service members to augment security forces by training all first-term airmen," said Tech. Sgt. James Chubb, 87th Security Forces Squadron Noncommissioned Officer in charge of security forces training.

The first training day begins with a series of presentations regarding key information needed to operate as an augmentee. The presentations included security forces concepts and operations, blood-borne pathogen counteraction, weapons safety and communications. The last presentation covers practical application of lethal and non-lethal use of force.

Students begin hands-on training of the collapsible baton upon completion of the classroom portion. This training includes using proper stance, opening the collapsible baton, using proper striking techniques and closing the baton. Students take turns striking a training bag after observing the instructor demonstrate proper technique.

"All armed personnel performing a force protection function should have a less-than-lethal tool available," said Chubb. "This tool gives personnel other force options to control a situation."

The second training day begins with a unit physical training session. After a break, the lessons leading up to hands-on training are searches and reporting procedures.

"I enjoyed not being overwhelmed by slideshows in the classroom," said Airman 1st Class Paul Stigler, 87th Logistics Readiness Squadron fire truck maintainer. "The handcuffing class was the most informative training I received."

Hands-on training follows classroom lessons with apprehension procedure techniques and individual and small-group tactics. Students practice application of handcuffs and handling unruly or resisting perpetrators.

"Apprehension training is conducted to train an augmentee how to detain an individual and complete an effective search if needed," said Chubb.

Individual and small-group tactics training follows apprehension training in the second day. Students learn to operate as a three-person or four-person fire team. The fire team's goal is to search for an active-shooter, then eliminate the perpetrator once found. The team practices entering rooms and engaging contacts with M4 carbine training rifles.

"A scenario may arise when an augmentee may have to respond to a situation with a security forces member, they should be able to mirror the tactics of a security forces member to ensure officer safety and mission accomplishment," said Chubb.

Airmen are certified for a year to perform augmentee duty after completion of the security forces augmentee training.

"Security is the basis of what we do," said Chief Master Sgt. Scott Pepper, Joint Base Police superintendent. "Security is the foundation that allows all our missions to be successful. Increased security requirements arise when circumstances occur locally or globally that would increase our force protection condition. This training allows all Airmen to be a sensor, a force multiplier, allowing for all missions to go on unhindered."