News Icon

News: 25th ASOS airmen conduct close-air-support training at Red Flag-Alaska

Story by Tech. Sgt. Michael HolzworthSmall RSS IconSubscriptions Icon

Red Flag-Alaska 12-2 Tech. Sgt. Michael Holzworth

An U.S. Army UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter from the 16th Combat Aviation Brigade, Fort Wainwright, Alaska, flies over the Joint Pacific Range Complex near Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, during Red Flag-Alaska 12-2. Red Flag-Alaska is a Pacific Air Forces-sponsored, joint/coalition, tactical air combat employment exercise which corresponds to the operational capability of participating units. The entire exercise takes place in the Joint Pacific Range Complex over Alaska as well as a portion of Western Canada for a total airspace of more than 67,000 square miles.

JOINT PACIFIC RANGE COMPLEX, Alaska – Imagine being on a patrol in a distant river bed or village - enemy ground forces closing in, mortar shells exploding all around- then like a guardian angel an U.S. Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II descends seemingly out of nowhere with a loud burst from its 30 mm cannon. There are bursts of fire and smoke as the enemy scatters in full retreat.

This may sound like a scene from a movie, but for U.S. Air Force joint terminal attack controller airmen, it is just another day on the job.

Joint terminal attack controller airmen from the 25th Air Support Operations Squadron, (ASOS) Wheeler Army Air Field, Hawaii, trained from June 7-22 in the wilderness of Alaska to conduct close-air-support training with U.S. and coalition air forces during Red Flag-Alaska 12-2.

“This training is beneficial for us because back home all the training we do is dry CAS scenarios without any live ordnance,” said U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Therron Bundick, 25th ASOS, JTAC. “So to come here and actually get to drop live ordnance is a bonus for us.”

The training here at Red Flag affords the 25th ASOS, JTACs an unique opportunity to integrate with U.S. and coalition aircrews during what has traditionally been an air-to-air exercise by getting into the field. Together, they are operationally testing equipment like the mission ruggedized tablet used for digital aided CAS. Even though digital CAS is not new to the battlefield, it is a relatively new technology that is important for JATC’s and aircrew to have a high level proficiency in because of its importance in coordinating multinational aircraft with real time information.

“For us to be able to no kidding, plug it in and be able to see on a tablet the entire war or exercise and use it to pass on targeting information to everyone simultaneously is invaluable,” said U.S. Air Force Maj. Jonnie Green, 25th ASOS, air liaison officer, pilot. “We get a bigger picture that we don’t normally get to see. It’s a huge benefit.”

The integrated training between the JTACs and multinational aircrews help prepare forces for upcoming deployments.

“This is good spin up training for us getting to work together and learn new techniques benefit us and them while we are down range,” Bundick said.


Connected Media
ImagesRed Flag-Alaska 12-2
An U.S. Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II from the 25th...
ImagesRed Flag-Alaska 12-2
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Brandon Cook and Senior Airman...
ImagesRed Flag-Alaska 12-2
U.S. Army 1st Lt. Matthew Rankin, 2nd Stryker Brigade...
ImagesRed Flag-Alaska 12-2
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Brandon Cook and Senior Airman...
ImagesRed Flag-Alaska 12-2
U.S. Air Force Maj. Jonnie Green,(left) Air Liaison...
ImagesRed Flag-Alaska 12-2
U.S. Air Force Maj. Jonnie Green, Air Liaison Officer...
ImagesRed Flag-Alaska 12-2
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Brandon Cook and Senior Airman...
ImagesRed Flag-Alaska 12-2
An U.S. Army UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter from the 16th...
ImagesRed Flag-Alaska 12-2
An U.S. Army UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter from the 16th...
ImagesRed Flag-Alaska 12-2
An U.S. Army UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter from the 16th...
ImagesRed Flag-Alaska 12-2
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Therron Bundick, a joint...
ImagesRed Flag-Alaska 12-2
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Brandon Cook, a joint terminal...
ImagesRed Flag-Alaska 12-2
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Brandon Cook, a joint terminal...
ImagesRED FLAG-Alaska 12-2
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Brandon Cook, a joint terminal...
ImagesRed Flag-Alaska 12-2
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Brandon Cook, and Senior...
ImagesRed Flag-Alaska 12-2
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Brandon Cook, a joint terminal...
ImagesRed Flag-Alaska 12-2
An U.S. Army UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter from the 16th...


Web Views
194
Downloads
0

Podcast Hits
0



Public Domain Mark
This work, 25th ASOS airmen conduct close-air-support training at Red Flag-Alaska, by TSgt Michael Holzworth, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:06.15.2012

Date Posted:06.26.2012 01:07

Location:EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, AK, USGlobe

More Like This

  • Members of the 428th Fighter Squadron arrived here Oct. 3, 2012, to participate in the realistic, 10-day air combat training exercise known as Red Flag-Alaska.
  • After training six years with specially designed F-16 Fighting Falcons, Polish air force "Tigers" traveled half the world over in their first transatlantic voyage to Alaska to experience world-class training at RED FLAG-Alaska 12-2.
  • The 428th Fighter Squadron concluded the first Red Flag-Alaska exercise of the fiscal year Oct. 19, 2012, after two weeks of intense, air-combat training throughout the vast mountain ranges of the Yukon River Valley near Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska.
  • History was made during the most recent Red Flag-Alaska. The Royal Norwegian Air Force made its debut with 23 airmen and one C-130 Hercules from the 135th Air Wing of Gardermoen Air Station, Norway.

Options

  • Army
  • Marines
  • Navy
  • Air Force
  • Coast Guard
  • National Guard

HOLIDAY GREETINGS

SELECT A HOLIDAY:

VIDEO ON DEMAND

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Youtube
  • Flickr