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Workhorse battalion holds NCO induction ceremony Staff Sgt. Cory Thatcher

Non-commissioned officers recite the charge of the NCO during an NCO induction ceremony held May 18 on Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan. The ceremony was organized by the 10th Sustainment Brigade Troops Battalion from Fort Drum, N.Y.

BAGRAM AIR FIELD, Afghanistan – The 10th Sustainment Brigade Troops Battalion “Workhorse” held a non-commissioned officer induction ceremony May 18 at the Morale, Welfare and Recreation clamshell here.

The event was preceded by two days of classes and training covering military customs and courtesies, history of the NCO, troop leading procedures, time management, drill and ceremony, problem solving skills, and duties, responsibilities and authority of the NCO.

After the singing of the national anthem by Sgt. Jalisa Buchanan, a 10th SBDE medic and an invocation by Sgt. Edward A. Webb Jr., a 10th SBDE chaplain’s assistant.

Red, white and blue candles were lit by First Sgt. Michael Ostrander, senior enlisted adviser assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 10th SBTB; First Sgt. Adrian Randall, senior enlisted adviser assigned to the 10th Quartermaster Provisional Company, and First Sgt. Darrel Baxter, senior enlisted adviser assigned to the 33rd Finance Management Company.

The red candle represented the past and the valor that the NCO strives for. The white candle represented the present and the purity and honesty the NCO should embrace. The blue candle represented the future and the vigilance and loyalty with which the NCO serves.

The honored guest and speaker at the ceremony was Command Sgt. Maj. Barry E. Maieritisch, senior enlisted adviser of support for United States Forces- Afghanistan.

“This is a time for non-commissioned officers that have bought into and are sold on the Army values,” said Maieritisch. “We are not as loyal to each other as we should be, soldiers can tell the difference between sergeants that are just going through the motions, just caring about getting promoted and those that really care about their soldiers. “

He counseled the NCOs to care enough to really get to know their soldiers on a personal level.

“Being a great NCO depends on finding the right balance between the mind and the heart; between the letter of the law and understanding where a soldier is developmentally and how to get him to the next level,” he said.

He acknowledged that some soldiers come into the Army with troubled backgrounds but challenged the audience to look inward and make the changes necessary to overcome prior inappropriate behaviors and attitudes.

“Don’t let the experiences of your past deny you the blessings of the future,” said Maieritisch.

In closing, Maieritisch told the audience that it is an honor and a privilege to lead and train the next generation of the Army.

“Soldiers deserve respect; they are a gift,” he said.

After Maieritisch’s remarks, Command Sgt. Major Mark E. Phillips, the 10th SBTB senior enlisted adviser, inducted the NCOs by delivering the Charge of the NCO. Following the NCO charge, Staff Sgt. Brandon Butler, an operations NCO assigned to HHC, 10th SBTB, led the recitation of the NCO Creed.

The ceremony concluded with the singing of the Army and 10th Mountain Division songs.


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This work, Workhorse battalion holds NCO induction ceremony, by SSG Cory Thatcher, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:05.18.2012

Date Posted:06.01.2012 08:14

Location:BAGRAM AIR FIELD, AFGlobe

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