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5-1 CAV trains in Arctic Capt. Patrick Bracken

A Troop, 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment participates in Stryker Gunnery Training in the Yukon Training Area, Alaska March 23- April 14. (Photo by Chaplain (Capt.) Patrick Bracken)

FORT WAINWRIGHT, Alaska - Soldiers from 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, left Fort Wainwright, March 23, and moved to the Yukon Training Area, Alaska to establish an assembly in preparation for Stryker Gunnery Training March 23-April 14.

The Squadron Quartering Party, a group of logistics Soldiers tasked to establish the base camp to speed up operational readiness, arrived at YTA a day ahead of the battalion and received the Troops and set-up the tactical operations center.

They also established communication and logistical assets and prepared the site for the arrival of the Squadron’s Strykers, Humvees, and Troopers.

“This gunnery validated the Squadron for future live-fire missions to include integration into the Air Force’s Red Flag exercise,” said Capt. Brad Herkimer, A Troop commander. “Alpha Troopers had the opportunity to build and solidify their skills as crew members on the Stryker Reconnaissance Vehicle.”

During the gunnery Troopers trained and fired: MK-19 grenade launcher; M2 .50-caliber machine gun; M240B machine gun; M4 carbine; 120mm mortar; and 60mm mortar in various tactical scenarios. Troopers fired range Stryker Gunnery along with section live fires, mortar live fires and arctic reconnaissance missions.

Stryker crews worked toward greater proficiency in their ability to acquire, identify, engage and destroy targets. The command and control capabilities of the squadron were employed at troop and squadron level with the use of frequency modulated and high frequency radios, Retransmission Strykers and a wide range of digital systems, tracking all elements moving and training during the operation.

When not actively involved in shooting gunnery, troops worked on enhancing their arctic skills by erecting 10-man-tents and space heater arctic stoves, moving with ahkio sleds, snowshoeing, cross country skiing and building thermal shelters in the snow.

“This additional training further solidified 5-1 CAV’s capability to serve as part of the Army’s premier arctic fighting force,” said Capt. Brent Carr, C Troop commander. “We accomplished a great deal during our platoon tactical training block. We worked on setting up observation posts, maneuvering linear danger crossings, tactical over-snow movement and urban reconnaissance. Our Troopers gained a greater appreciation for how their equipment enhances their ability to move, fight and survive in the snow and cold.”

“As a Cavalry Squadron serving on America’s last frontier we ask our Soldiers to perform and excel in conditions that few of their peers will ever experience,” said Lt. Col Erik Krivda, 5-1 CAV commanding officer. “The training in the arctic environment leading up to this exercise enabled our Soldiers to negate the effects of the cold and snow and focus solely on conducting live-fire training and maneuvering across the frozen terrain. Conducting these tasks in arctic terrain is essential to protect and defend U.S. national interests in the Arctic region.”


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Public Domain Mark
This work, 5-1 CAV Soldiers test training in Arctic, by CPT Patrick Bracken, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:04.14.2014

Date Posted:04.14.2014 15:09

Location:FORT WAINWRIGHT, AK, USGlobe

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