News Icon

News: Troops maintain skills with radio training

Story by Sgt. Samantha ParksSmall RSS IconSubscriptions Icon

Troops maintain skills with radio training Sgt. Samantha Parks

U.S. Army Pfc. Johani Londono Jr., the instructor for the day's training and a native of Miami, explains the operations of a radio to U.S. Army 1st Lieutenant Brett Bowdren, his platoon leader and a native of Charleston, S.C., during radio training at Camp Cabra, Oct. 31. The training covered everything from proper ways to send products over high frequency to properly setting up an antenna. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Samantha Parks, 4th Public Affairs Detachment)

CAMP CABRA, Kosovo – U.S. troops from Company C, 1st Squadron, 38th Cavalry Regiment conducted radio training at Camp Cabra, Oct. 31.

“We are practicing training on sending data over high frequency using the radios that we have in the company,” said U.S. Army 1st Lt. Brett Bowdren, signal platoon leader and a native of Charleston, S.C.

Bowdren said the training is important because it is an essential part of the soldiers’ mission.

“When they’re out on missions and at surveillance sites, [soldiers] will send pictures back through radio waves back to our TOC [tactical operations center], which will help us shape the next part of their mission,” Bowdren said.

U.S. Army Pfc. Johani Londono Jr., the instructor for the day’s training and a native of Miami, said the purpose of long range surveillance is being able to go out and pull surveillance and then send important information back to the command.

Bowdren said it is important to have junior soldiers conduct training because it shows the knowledge the younger soldiers have and that they can teach someone else. He said Londono did a good job with the class.

“We like to train within the team,” Londono said. “Every person should know their job.”

Londono said he has full confidence in his leaders and the knowledge they have passed on to him.

“They taught me everything I know about the radios,” he said.

The soldiers conduct regular training to maintain mission readiness. As a detachment, Londono said they like to conduct daily training so that everyone is constantly refreshing their memories on any little things that they may have missed.

“The radio is the most deadly weapon in the battlefield and we make sure we know every aspect of it,” Londono said.


Connected Media
ImagesTroops maintain...
Soldiers from Company C, 1st Squadron, 38th Cavalry...
ImagesTroops maintain...
Soldiers of Company C, 1st Squadron, 38th Cavalry...
ImagesTroops maintain...
U.S. Army Pfc. Johani Londono Jr., the instructor for...


Web Views
101
Downloads
0

Podcast Hits
0



Public Domain Mark
This work, Troops maintain skills with radio training, by SGT Samantha Parks, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:11.06.2013

Date Posted:11.06.2013 02:57

Location:CAMP CABRA, ZZ

Hometown:CHARLESTON, SC, US

Hometown:FORT BRAGG, NC, US

Hometown:MIAMI, FL, US

More Like This

  • For the past decade, troops have been training for deployments centered mostly around Iraq and Afghanistan, but with the change in pace, troops from Charlie Company, 1st Squadron, 38th Cavalry Regiment, Fort Bragg, N.C., are preparing to head to Kosovo as part of KFOR 17.
  • Fifteen soldiers with 1st Squadron, 38th Cavalry Regiment, completed Fires University training at Camp Bondsteel Dec. 16- 20.
  • Responsibility for the Multinational Battle Group-East Forward Command Post transferred from 1st Battalion, 118th Infantry Regiment, activated out of Union, S.C., to 1st Squadron, 38th Cavalry Regiment, from Fort Bragg, N.C., at a ceremony held at Camp Novo Selo May 24.
  • They arrived in groups, three flights to be precise, spread over the course of a week in late September. All descended the ramp from their respective plane to clear Customs and board buses bound for Camp Atterbury Joint Maneuver Training Center, Ind.  Thus, the Soldiers of Kosovo Force 15 returned to the U.S. after a year-long mission in Kosovo, an eastern European country that gained independence from Serbia. 
	The KFOR mission began June 12, 1999, in the wake of the Kosovo War between ethnic Albanian separatists and the military of the former Republic of Yugoslavia, which was dominated by Serbia. For 14 years and fifteen rotations, the Army has deployed a task force to this remote corner of Europe, which has played a disproportionate role in history. The 20th Century began with a war started in the Balkans and it ended with a different war in the same region.

Options

  • Army
  • Marines
  • Navy
  • Air Force
  • Coast Guard
  • National Guard

HOLIDAY GREETINGS

SELECT A HOLIDAY:

VIDEO ON DEMAND

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Youtube
  • Flickr