Camera Icon

Images: Inspection lab keeps aircraft healthy [Image 4 of 8]

Photo by Senior Airman Christopher WillisSmall RSS IconSubscriptions Icon

Inspection lab keeps aircraft healthy

Fluorescent magnetic particle bath flows over a nose landing gear wheel bolt during an inspection, July 31, 2013, Ramstein Air Base, Germany. The fluorescent color comes from suspended iron particles which glow while under a black light. These iron particles are attracted to leakage fields caused by cracks in ferrous materials after being magnetized. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Chris Willis)



Web Views
6
Downloads
0

Podcast Hits
0



Public Domain Mark
This work, Inspection lab keeps aircraft healthy [Image 4 of 8], by SrA Christopher Willis, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:07.31.2013

Date Posted:08.08.2013 05:25

Photo ID:991073

VIRIN:130731-F-LR266-974

Resolution:6048x4032

Size:4.92 MB

Location:RAMSTEIN AIR BASE, DEGlobe

Gallery Images

More Like This

  • Senior Airman Paul Nessle, 2nd Maintenance Squadron non-destructive inspector, applies a fluorescent magnetic particle solution to an aircraft part on Barksdale Air Force Base, La., May 9. When magnetized, the solution will show the NDI airmen if there are any cracks in the part.
  • Senior Airman Paul Nessle, 2nd Maintenance Squadron non-destructive inspector, checks for cracks on an aircraft part during a fluorescent magnetic particle test on Barksdale Air Force Base, La., May 9. This is one of many tests NDI Airmen use to ensure the structural integrity of aircraft components.
  • Staff Sgt. James Cone, 386th Expeditionary Maintenance Squadron, uses a DA 200 Parker Probe, a magnet used to produce a magnetic field, on a bolt at an air base in Southwest Asia, April 11. Once a piece of equipment is properly magnetized, it is lightly coated with a Fluorescent Magnetic Particle spray which contains tiny metal particles that fluoresce when placed under a black light, revealing any cracks. Sergeant Cone is currently deployed from Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, and is originally from Jacksonville, Ark.
  • Senior Airman Paul Nessle, 2nd Maintenance Squadron non-destructive inspector, checks for cracks on an aircraft part during a fluorescent magnetic particle test on Barksdale Air Force Base, La., May 9. When applied to a magnetized part, the solution accumulates in small cracks, making them visible under a black light.

Associated News

Inspection lab keeps aircraft healthy

Options

  • Army
  • Marines
  • Navy
  • Air Force
  • Coast Guard
  • National Guard

HOLIDAY GREETINGS

SELECT A HOLIDAY:

VIDEO ON DEMAND

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Youtube
  • Flickr