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Images: Medical soldiers hone skills for chemical environment [Image 4 of 6]

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Medical soldiers hone skills for chemical environment

U.S. Soldiers assigned to the 520th Area Support Medical Company and 349th Chemical Company work together to prepare casualties for decontamination after a simulated chemical plant explosion during a Defense Chemical, Radiological, Biological, Nuclear, and Explosive Response Force evaluation at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., June 27, 2013. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Sarah E. Enos/Released)



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Public Domain Mark
This work, Medical soldiers hone skills for chemical environment [Image 4 of 6], by SGT Sarah Enos, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:06.27.2013

Date Posted:07.03.2013 12:08

Photo ID:965318

VIRIN:130627-A-FS521-081

Resolution:1800x1196

Size:1.7 MB

Location:JOINT BASE LEWIS-MCCHORD, WA, USGlobe

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  • Emma Sharee Calica, left, greets her father, U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Austen Calica, after a ceremony at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Feb. 14, 2013. U.S. Soldiers with the 9th Chemical Company returned from a year-long deployment to the Republic of Korea to provide technical escort services to U.S. Forces Korea. Calica is a Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosive (CBRNE) Noncommissioned officer with the CBRNE Response Team 2, 9th Chemical Company. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Loren Cook/Released)
  • Emma Sharee Calica, left, greets her father, U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Austen Calica, after a ceremony at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Feb. 14, 2013. U.S. Soldiers with the 9th Chemical Company returned from a year-long deployment to the Republic of Korea to provide technical escort services to U.S. Forces Korea. Calica is a Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosive (CBRNE) Noncommissioned officer with the CBRNE Response Team 2, 9th Chemical Company. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Loren Cook/Released)
  • A decontamination team rinses Sgt. Ruben Lugo Jr., an explosive ordinance disposal sergeant with B Company, 110th Chemical Battalion from Joint Base Lewis McChord, Wash., with water simulating a chemical decontamination liquid after being designated as a chemical casualty during his entry team’s certification process at the Yakima Training Center, May 7. B Company was in YTC in support of 2nd Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) Battalion’s Defense CBRNE (Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and high- yield Explosives) Response Force (DCRF). The DCRF is made up of more than 800 soldiers in 16 supporting units from six different military installations across the country who could respond to any U.S. CBRNE incident to prevent the loss of American civilians.
  • Sgt. Ruben Lugo Jr., an explosive ordinance disposal sergeant with B Company, 110th Chemical Battalion from Joint Base Lewis McChord, Wash., has his chemical suit cut off of him by a decontamination team after being designated as a chemical casualty during his entry team’s certification process at the Yakima Training Center, May 7. B Company was in YTC in support of 2nd Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) Battalion’s Defense CBRNE (Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and high- yield Explosives) Response Force (DCRF). The DCRF is made up of more than 800 soldiers in 16 supporting units from six different military installations across the country who could respond to any U.S. CBRNE incident to prevent the loss of American civilians.

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Medical soldiers hone skills for chemical environment

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