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Images: First Army soldiers develop relationships to be Army’s most cost effective solution to train others [Image 4 of 4]

Photo by Capt. Olivia CobiskeySmall RSS IconSubscriptions Icon

First Army soldiers develop relationships to be Army’s most cost effective solution to train others

The OSAA, based at Davison Army Airfield on Fort Belvoir, Va., provides fixed-wing pilots and crews to fly reconnaissance and surveillance missions in direct support and contact with troops on the ground in Afghanistan, the Sinai, and the Horn of Africa and now throughout the United States. OSAA pilots and aircraft require a set number of flight hours each month. Partnering with the OSAA allows pilots to meet their flight time and aircraft utilization needs while reducing transportation costs the First Army incurred during the planning and execution of training. (U.S. Army photo by Capt. Olivia Cobiskey)



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Public Domain Mark
This work, First Army soldiers develop relationships to be Army’s most cost effective solution to train others [Image 4 of 4], by CPT Olivia Cobiskey, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:02.01.2013

Date Posted:03.12.2013 09:49

Photo ID:884697

VIRIN:130201-A-OC713-001

Resolution:4288x2848

Size:1.22 MB

Location:IN, US

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First Army soldiers develop relationships to be Army’s most cost effective solution to train others

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