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Images: Never forget: World War II airman, POW, shares story of resiliency [Image 1 of 2]

Photo by Airman 1st Class Tom BradingSmall RSS IconSubscriptions Icon

Never forget: World War II airman, POW, shares story of resiliency

Jim Gatch, 89-year-old Army Air Corps veteran and World War II prisoner-of-war, reflects on his POW experience by looking at his military decorations, including the Purple Heart, for a photograph Sept. 10, 2012, at his home in Summerville, S.C. On May 12, 1944, while assigned to the 379th Bomb Group, Gatch was a base gunner on a B-17 aircraft that was shot down by the Germans. He was captured y the enemy and remained a POW for 358 days. The Purple Heart is a United States military decoration awarded in the name of the President to service members wounded or killed while serving on or after April 5, 1917. On Sept. 21, Gatch will be in attendance with other surviving Lowcountry POWs in observance of the National POW/MIA Recognition Day.



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Public Domain Mark
This work, Never forget: World War II airman, POW, shares story of resiliency [Image 1 of 2], by A1C Tom Brading, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:09.11.2012

Date Posted:09.20.2012 08:53

Photo ID:668751

VIRIN:120911-F-NK398-136

Resolution:4023x2634

Size:2.4 MB

Location:JOINT BASE CHARLESTON, SC, USGlobe

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Never forget: World War II airman, POW, shares story of resiliency

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