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Images: Lejeune home to many threatened, endangered species [Image 12 of 14]

Photo by Lance Cpl. Jackeline Perez RiveraSmall RSS IconSubscriptions Icon

Lejeune home to many threatened, endangered species

An American alligator exits a body of water and show its pearly whites aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, May 4. American alligators are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, and hunting them carries a stiff fine.



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Public Domain Mark
This work, Lejeune home to many threatened, endangered species [Image 12 of 14], by Cpl Jackeline Perez Rivera, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:05.04.2011

Date Posted:09.17.2012 13:39

Photo ID:666505

VIRIN:110504-M-IY869-002

Resolution:2488x1412

Size:3.31 MB

Location:CAMP LEJEUNE, NC, USGlobe

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  • Craig E. Ten Brink, a Glen Rock, N.J., native and the base threatened and endangered species program manager, talks to Marines with 2nd Marine Logistics Group about preservation of endangered plant and animal species aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C., Dec. 5, 2012. Camp Lejeune has higher populations of endangered species than the National Park Service or Forest Service due to little human expansion.
  • An alligator basks in the sun in a fenced area surrounding a storm water pond aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune's Tawara Terrace residential area, June 16. The American alligator is listed as threatened in North Carolina by the Unites States Fish and Wildlife Service, and under state law, it is illegal to feed them in the wild.
  • Craig E. Ten Brink, a Glen Rock, N.J., native, and the base threatened and endangered species program manager, discusses the negative impact humans can have on the environment during a training seminar with 2nd Marine Logistics Group aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C., Dec. 5, 2012. Ten Brink cautioned the Marines to dispose of waste the proper way and to watch out for fellow servicemembers' recycling habits.
  • The desert tortoise is one of many animals that call the Combat Center home. They are also the only species aboard the installation listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. The Tortoise Research and Captive Rearing Site helps bolster the local population of the desert tortoise with head starting. Head starting involves bringing in pregnant tortoises, allowing them to lay their eggs in the facility and then safe guarding the hatchlings until they are large enough to fend off predation and can better withstand the harsh desert elements.  If the population of the desert tortoise declines, the species could become listed as endangered. This could compromise Marines’ ability to train aboard the Combat Center. TRACRS contains their head starting site to one part of the base, helping to keep the population out of training areas. The implementation of programs such as TRACRS is the Combat Center’s way of protecting and growing the population of the threatened species which in turn allows the Marine Corps to continue training operations aboard its premier pre-deployment training facility.

Associated News

Lejeune home to many threatened, endangered species

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