Camera Icon

Images: Encroachment causes safety risks in East Miramar [Image 2 of 9]

Photo by Cpl. Erica KirsopSmall RSS IconSubscriptions Icon

Encroachment causes safety risks in East Miramar

Trespassers have been causing habitat destruction aboard East Miramar through off-road driving. The air station contains 10 species protected by the Endangered Species Act. There are six plants, two birds and two species of fairy shrimp that are listed as threatened or endangered. For years, off-roading has been a problem aboard the air station. All the areas hosting the endangered species around the station are not marked. However, the large areas with vernal pools have signs reading "No entry."



Web Views
87
Downloads
1

Podcast Hits
0



Public Domain Mark
This work, Encroachment causes safety risks in East Miramar [Image 2 of 9], by Cpl Erica Kirsop, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:11.21.2011

Date Posted:11.28.2011 14:09

Photo ID:492302

VIRIN:111121-M-UP717-086

Resolution:5616x3744

Size:10.16 MB

Location:MARINE CORPS AIR STATION MIRAMAR, CA, USGlobe

Gallery Images

More Like This

  • A California bobcat was on display during the Living Green Expo aboard Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., April 18. The bobcat is one of the local endangered species, and the Environmental Management Systems used this display to inform attendees about other local endangered species and ways to protect their existence.
  • A bee lands on a native California plant in a garden used to observe endangered and non-endangered plants outside the station environmental office aboard Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., Jan. 29. The area has experienced a decline in bees due to sickness spreading in the bee population. Endangered plants rely on bees to carry their pollen from plant to plant in order to reproduce.
  • A ruler stands secured to a pole over a vernal pool in a fenced in area aboard Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., Jan. 22. Rulers like this are used to measure the depth of vernal pools where two endangered species of fairy shrimp can be found. Without water, the fairy shrimp lay dormant in the ground until the pool fills again.
  • A new willowy monardella sprouts from the ground in the garden outside of the installation’s environmental office aboard Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., Jan. 29. This new sprouting plant shows hope for the endangered species aboard the air station. With proper care and room to grow, this plant can begin to truly repopulate.

Associated News

Encroachment causes safety risks in East Miramar

Options

  • Army
  • Marines
  • Navy
  • Air Force
  • Coast Guard
  • National Guard

HOLIDAY GREETINGS

SELECT A HOLIDAY:

VIDEO ON DEMAND

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Youtube
  • Flickr