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Images: Bagram USDA Wildlife Services [Image 4 of 5]

Photo by Staff Sgt. Sheila DeveraSmall RSS IconSubscriptions Icon

Bagram USDA Wildlife Services

A long-legged Buzzard waits patiently for varmints at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, April 13. The 455th Air Expeditionary Wing Safety Wildlife biologist, uses different techniques to reduce birds population around the flightline that can potentially cause safety hazards.



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Public Domain Mark
This work, Bagram USDA Wildlife Services [Image 4 of 5], by SSgt Sheila Devera, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:04.13.2011

Date Posted:04.13.2011 12:28

Photo ID:389287

VIRIN:110413-F-XA488-134

Resolution:4256x2832

Size:1.35 MB

Location:BAGRAM AIR FIELD, AFGlobe

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