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Navy Medical Unit

Having just received multiple patients from an insurgent attack in the Al Anbar Province of Iraq, the sailors and Marines of Taqaddum Surgical had their hands full. Petty Officer 3rd Class Joshua W. Bromley and Petty Officer 3rd Class Jesse K. Bolstad, corpsmen with the unit, take a breather during treatment as other medical personnel continue working on the injured service members. Bromley, a 24-year old native of Gosnell, Ark.; Bolstad, a 32-year-old native of Spokane, Wash., and Taqaddum Surgical handle the duties of both a shock trauma platoon and a forward resuscitative surgical suite here, which are essentially makeshift emergency and operating rooms, respectively. When a service member is injured in battle in the Al Anbar Province, he receives specialized resuscitative care from the STP, with surgical care provided by the FRSS. More extensive care is provided at one of the Combat Army Surgical Hospitals in Baghdad or Balad



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Public Domain Mark
This work, Navy Medical Unit [Image 2 of 16], by CPT Robert Shuford, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:04.26.2006

Date Posted:04.26.2006 10:35

Photo ID:18665

Resolution:2457x1797

Size:2.54 MB

Location:AL ANBAR PROVINCE, IQGlobe

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  • Treatment at Taqaddum Surgical is only the beginning for some patients, many of whom are flown by medical helicopter evacuation to higher levels of care elsewhere in Iraq. Navy Lieutenants Robert Spencer, of Sylacauga, Ala., and Kristian Sanchack, of San Diego, along with Petty Officer 1st Class James Wallace, of Queen Creek, Az., and Petty Officer 3rd Class Jesse Bolstad, of Spokane, Wash., quickly transport a wounded service member from the treatment room to the ambulance April 27, 2006. The staff of Taqaddum Surgical, the main facility of its kind in the region, treated several soldiers of the Iraqi Army after a recent insurgent attack. The Iraqi unit had several wounded in the attack that also hit two American service members attached to the unit's Military Transition Team. Taqaddum Surgical is classified as a surgical shock trauma platoon because it has two main elements: a shock trauma platoon, which serves as an emergency room, and a forward resuscitative surgical suite -- a battlefield operating room. The MTT is a small group of American military personnel tasked with training and advising the Iraqi soldiers as they take control of their country.
  • On 6 September 2006 service members with Taqaddum Surgical, 1st Marine Logistics Group (Fwd.), unload a "casualty" from an ambulance during the "mass casualty" drill on Wednesday, September 6th.  "(The mass casualty drill) lets them (replacements) know how chaotic things can get," said Petty Officer 2nd Class Oscar M. Morales, 24-year-old section leader for the Shock Trauma Platoon with Taqaddum Surgical.  Mass casualty means that up to or more than 20 patients arrive in less than a half hour.  Petty Officer 2nd Class Joshua W. Bromley, a corpsman with Taqaddum Surgical said that corpsmen should "never go complacent, because you never know what can come through that door."  Service members in the exercise treated many different simulated injuries, varying from minor to fatal. Teqaddum Surgical, 1st Marine Logistics Group is deployed with I MEF (FWD) in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in the Al Anbar Province of Iraq (MNF-W) to develop the Iraqi Security Forces, facilitate the development of official rule of law through democratic government reforms, and continue the development of a market based economy centered on Iraqi Reconstruction. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Corporal Geoffrey P. Ingersoll)
  • On 6 September 2006 service members with Taqaddum Surgical, 1st Marine Logistics Group (Fwd.), treated many "casualties" during the "mass casualty" drill on Wednesday, September 6th.  "(The mass casualty drill) lets them (replacements) know how chaotic things can get," said Petty Officer 2nd Class Oscar M. Morales, 24-year-old section leader for the Shock Trauma Platoon with Taqaddum Surgical.  Mass casualty means that up to or more than 20 patients arrive in less than a half hour.  Petty Officer 2nd Class Joshua W. Bromley, a corpsman with Taqaddum Surgical said that corpsmen should "never go complacent, because you never know what can come through that door."  Service members in the exercise treated many different simulated injuries, varying from minor to fatal. Teqaddum Surgical, 1st Marine Logistics Group is deployed with I MEF (FWD) in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in the Al Anbar Province of Iraq (MNF-W) to develop the Iraqi Security Forces, facilitate the development of official rule of law through democratic government reforms, and continue the development of a market based economy centered on Iraqi Reconstruction. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Corporal Geoffrey P. Ingersoll)
  • On 6 September 2006 service members with Taqaddum Surgical, 1st Marine Logistics Group (Fwd.), treated many "casualties" during the "mass casualty" drill on Wednesday, September 6th.  "(The mass casualty drill) lets them (replacements) know how chaotic things can get," said Petty Officer 2nd Class Oscar M. Morales, 24-year-old section leader for the Shock Trauma Platoon with Taqaddum Surgical.  Mass casualty means that up to or more than 20 patients arrive in less than a half hour.  Petty Officer 2nd Class Joshua W. Bromley, a corpsman with Taqaddum Surgical said that corpsmen should "never go complacent, because you never know what can come through that door."  Service members in the exercise treated many different simulated injuries, varying from minor to fatal. Teqaddum Surgical, 1st Marine Logistics Group is deployed with I MEF (FWD) in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in the Al Anbar Province of Iraq (MNF-W) to develop the Iraqi Security Forces, facilitate the development of official rule of law through democratic government reforms, and continue the development of a market based economy centered on Iraqi Reconstruction. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Corporal Geoffrey P. Ingersoll)

Associated News

Navy medical unit critical to lifesaving efforts in Iraq

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