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Images: Photo Gallery: Parris Island recruits train physically, mentally for title Marine [Image 10 of 13]

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Photo Gallery: Parris Island recruits train physically, mentally for title Marine

Rct. Charles Avila, left, battles Rct. Chad Compton during a pugil stick match Dec. 10, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits fight with pugil sticks, which represent rifles with fixed bayonets, to simulate a close encounter with an enemy. This training is part of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which combines hand-to-hand combat skills with mental discipline and character development to help transform recruits into physically and morally sound warriors. Avila, 18, from Jamesville, N.C., and Compton, 18, from Henrietta, N.Y., are scheduled to graduate with Platoon 3009, India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, on Feb. 14, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)



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Public Domain Mark
This work, Photo Gallery: Parris Island recruits train physically, mentally for title Marine [Image 10 of 13], by Cpl Caitlin Brink, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:12.10.2013

Date Posted:12.19.2013 17:01

Photo ID:1141584

VIRIN:131210-M-FS592-102

Resolution:5760x3840

Size:4.54 MB

Location:PARRIS ISLAND, SC, USGlobe

Hometown:HENRIETTA, NY, US

Hometown:JAMESVILLE, NC, US

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  • Sgt. Donald Miller, a drill instructor with Platoon 3000, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, commands recruits to prepare safety equipment Nov. 4, 2013, before pugil stick training on Parris Island, S.C. Bayonet training is part of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which combines hand-to-hand combat skills with mental discipline and character development to help transform recruits into physically and morally sound warriors. Recruits fight with pugil sticks, which represent rifles with fixed bayonets, to simulate a close encounter with an enemy.  Pugil stick training became a regular part of the recruit training curriculum in 1956. Miller, 27, from Nacogdoches, Texas, is one of a handful of instructors responsible for ensuring the safety of recruits during the matches. Mike Company is scheduled to graduate Jan. 17, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
  • Rct. Charles Custance, right, Platoon 3038, deals a match-ending blow to Rct. Logan Rose, Platoon 3034, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, during pugil stick training March 10, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits fight with pugil sticks, which represent rifles with fixed bayonets, to simulate a close encounter with an enemy. Bayonet training is part of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which combines hand-to-hand combat skills with mental discipline and character development to help transform recruits into physically and morally sound warriors. Custance, 18, from Commack, N.Y., and Rose, 18, from Shreveport, La., are scheduled to graduate May 23, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
  • Rct. Jamal Hannah strikes a winning blow against Rct. Nick Shaw during a pugil stick match Oct. 4, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits fight with pugil sticks, which represent rifles with attached bayonets, to simulate a close encounter with an enemy. Bayonet training is part of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which combines hand-to-hand combat skills with mental discipline and character development to help transform recruits into physically and morally sound warriors. Hannah, an 18-year-old native of Newark, N.J., and Shaw, an 18-year-old native of Bristow, Va., both with Platoon 2101, Golf Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, are scheduled to graduate Dec. 6, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Pfc. Vaniah Temple)
  • Rct. Irvin Balfour Jr., left, Platoon 3088, battles Rct. Jeffrey Peterson, Platoon 3089, during pugil stick training Sept. 17, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits fight with pugil sticks, which represent rifles with attached bayonets, to simulate a close encounter with an enemy. Bayonet training is part of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which combines hand-to-hand combat skills with mental discipline and character development to help transform recruits into physically and morally sound warriors. Balfour, 18, from Hollywood, Fla., and Peterson, 20, from Jacksonville, N.C., are scheduled to graduate with Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, on Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

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