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Images: Army Corps continues to protect Texas water [Image 1 of 3]

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Army Corps continues to protect Texas water

Figure one from the scoping announcement for Regional Environmental Impact Statement for surface coal and lignite mining in Texas illustrates the approximate acreage and study area affected by potential future surface coal and lignite mine expansion. (Courtesy USGS-1997)



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This work, Army Corps continues to protect Texas water [Image 1 of 3], is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:12.13.2013

Date Posted:12.13.2013 15:43

Photo ID:1137089

VIRIN:131213-A-ZZ999-001

Resolution:911x1063

Size:443.71 KB

Location:FORT WORTH, TX, USGlobe

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Army Corps continues to protect Texas water

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