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Army Corps continues to protect Texas water

Grand Saline High School physics teacher Laura Gislason (right) directs her students at the sign-in table on Dec. 5 for the public scoping meeting held in Tyler, Texas, for the Regional Environmental Impact Statement for surface coal and lignite mining in Texas. The students participated in the National Environmental Policy Act process and were briefed on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics opportunities with the Army Corps of Engineers and industry.



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Public Domain Mark
This work, Army Corps continues to protect Texas water [Image 2 of 3], by Clayton Church, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:12.05.2013

Date Posted:12.13.2013 15:43

Photo ID:1137088

VIRIN:131205-A-CV723-052

Resolution:4608x3072

Size:3.48 MB

Location:TYLER, TX, USGlobe

Hometown:GRAND SALINE, TX, US

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NASA Identifier: hobet_mine

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Army Corps continues to protect Texas water

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