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Images: Saving our underwater world one manatee at a time [Image 6 of 6]

Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Gina Vaile-NelsonSmall RSS IconSubscriptions Icon

Saving our underwater world one manatee at a time

A manatee calf, captured by a team of U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo and Joint Task Force Guantanamo volunteers, waits for an official medical screening Nov. 13 at Lizard Island. The manatee was one of seven manatees captured during the Nov. 10-14 U.S. Geological Survey's Sirenia Project. The goal is to capture and radio tag as many of the sea mammals as possible so that scientists can gain a better understanding of the endangered species, and help communities such as U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo better protect them.



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Public Domain Mark
This work, Saving our underwater world one manatee at a time [Image 6 of 6], by SFC Gina Vaile-Nelson, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:11.13.2013

Date Posted:11.27.2013 15:09

Photo ID:1062157

VIRIN:131113-A-SP213-900

Resolution:703x571

Size:876.5 KB

Location:U.S. NAVAL STATION GUANTANAMO BAY, CU

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  • A volunteer for the manatee capture endeavors that took place throughout the first week in April, looks on as the lead capture boat heads back to land after a long afternoon of searching for untagged manatees. The USGS has been tracking manatee populations and their health in areas across the globe, including Puerto Rico, Florida, and even Brazil. The researchers hope to continue learning about the manatees in Guantanamo Bay, who seem to have a well controlled safe haven here. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt Spencer Rhodes)
  • Jim Reid, Susan Butler, Dr. Judd Kenworthy and other volunteers on the main United States Geological Survey boat scan the waters Monday, for a manatee in one of the many canals of U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. Manatees, a highly instinctive and intelligent animal, has a long memory and often eludes researchers just beyond their reach. The USGS crew finally managed to bring in a manatee on Tuesday for tagging and an encompassing health assessment before being released back into the bay. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. Spencer Rhodes)
  • Coast Guard personnel from Coast Guard Air Station Atlantic City and Coast Guard Air Station Elizabeth City, N.C., along with members of the Marine Mammal Stranding Center in Brigantine, N.J., transfer a manatee onto a Coast Guard C-130 Hercules airplane at Air Station Atlantic City for transport to Coast Guard Air Station Miami Oct. 29. Members of New Jersey Fish and Wildlife captured the manatee near Newark, N.J. (U.S. Coast Guard photo/Petty Officer 3rd Class Jonathan Lindberg)
  • Maya Rodriguez, a veterinarian at Miami Sea Aquarium in Miami, keeps a manatee wet with water while it is being transferred onto a Coast Guard C-130 Hercules airplane from Coast Guard Air Station Elizabeth City, N.C., at Coast Guard Air Station Atlantic City Oct. 29. Members of New Jersey Fish and Wildlife captured the manatee near Newark, N.J. (U.S. Coast Guard photo/Petty Officer 3rd Class Jonathan Lindberg)

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Saving our underwater world one manatee at a time

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