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Images: 110th Chem works with UK chemical counterparts [Image 1 of 3]

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110th Chem works with UK chemical counterparts

Soldiers of the 9th Chemical Company cut the chemical suit off a simulated injury as part of a combined training exercise at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Oct. 9-10. The 9th and 11th Chemical Company trained side-by-side with the 26th Squadron, Defence Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear Wing, Royal Air Force Regiment during the exercise where they exchanged ideas on how each group deals with chemical threats and work together to accomplish one mission.



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Public Domain Mark
This work, 110th Chem works with UK chemical counterparts [Image 1 of 3], by SSG David Chapman, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:10.09.2013

Date Posted:10.17.2013 16:40

Photo ID:1036351

VIRIN:131009-A-CD114-940

Resolution:4288x2848

Size:6.18 MB

Location:JOINT BASE LEWIS-MCCHORD, WA, USGlobe

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110th Chem works with UK chemical counterparts

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