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Fast roping prepares Marines for rapid ship-to-shore deployment

Lance Cpl. Zachary A. Barren, rifleman, Kilo Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, gives a warning to other Marines as their helicopter approaches an objective area during fast rope training here, Oct. 9, 2013.



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Public Domain Mark
This work, Fast roping prepares Marines for rapid ship-to-shore deployment [Image 1 of 6], by Sgt Jacob Harrer, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

Date Taken:10.09.2013

Date Posted:10.16.2013 19:03

Photo ID:1035602

VIRIN:131009-M-XZ121-200

Resolution:3456x5184

Size:5.33 MB

Location:MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP PENDLETON, CA, USGlobe

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  • Sixty Marines from 2nd Battalion, 7th Marines Regiment, descended from the skies during fast-rope training, March 23. The training exercise was designed to build and increase confidence in the Marines, many of whom have never fast-roped. Fast roping is a technique used to insert personnel into area where a helicopter can’t land. It is the preferred method of placement rather than rappelling because of its overall efficiency, effectiveness and ease of installation. “This training is a confidence builder for the Marines,” said Staff Sgt. Javier Sanchez, training chief and Echo Company, 2/7. “The more confidence you build the better off you will be in a combat zone.”
Most of the students have only fast-roped from a stationary platform or building. Getting used to a moving machine and unpredictable actions was a change of pace. The exercise was equally beneficial to pilots of HMM-364, also known as the Purple Foxes. They practiced hovering at minimum altitudes to clear obstacles but not so low that their down wash adversely affected the rope or Marines. They unloaded Marines from heights of 10-20 feet to as high as 60 feet.
  • Sixty Marines from 2nd Battalion, 7th Marines Regiment, descended from the skies during fast-rope training, March 23. The training exercise was designed to build and increase confidence in the Marines, many of whom have never fast-roped. Fast roping is a technique used to insert personnel into area where a helicopter can’t land. It is the preferred method of placement rather than rappelling because of its overall efficiency, effectiveness and ease of installation. “This training is a confidence builder for the Marines,” said Staff Sgt. Javier Sanchez, training chief and Echo Company, 2/7. “The more confidence you build the better off you will be in a combat zone.”
Most of the students have only fast-roped from a stationary platform or building. Getting used to a moving machine and unpredictable actions was a change of pace. The exercise was equally beneficial to pilots of HMM-364, also known as the Purple Foxes. They practiced hovering at minimum altitudes to clear obstacles but not so low that their down wash adversely affected the rope or Marines. They unloaded Marines from heights of 10-20 feet to as high as 60 feet.
  • Sixty Marines from 2nd Battalion, 7th Marines Regiment, descended from the skies during fast-rope training, March 23. The training exercise was designed to build and increase confidence in the Marines, many of whom have never fast-roped. Fast roping is a technique used to insert personnel into area where a helicopter can’t land. It is the preferred method of placement rather than rappelling because of its overall efficiency, effectiveness and ease of installation. “This training is a confidence builder for the Marines,” said Staff Sgt. Javier Sanchez, training chief and Echo Company, 2/7. “The more confidence you build the better off you will be in a combat zone.”
Most of the students have only fast-roped from a stationary platform or building. Getting used to a moving machine and unpredictable actions was a change of pace. The exercise was equally beneficial to pilots of HMM-364, also known as the Purple Foxes. They practiced hovering at minimum altitudes to clear obstacles but not so low that their down wash adversely affected the rope or Marines. They unloaded Marines from heights of 10-20 feet to as high as 60 feet.
  • Sixty Marines from 2nd Battalion, 7th Marines Regiment, descended from the skies during fast-rope training, March 23. The training exercise was designed to build and increase confidence in the Marines, many of whom have never fast-roped. Fast roping is a technique used to insert personnel into area where a helicopter can’t land. It is the preferred method of placement rather than rappelling because of its overall efficiency, effectiveness and ease of installation. “This training is a confidence builder for the Marines,” said Staff Sgt. Javier Sanchez, training chief and Echo Company, 2/7. “The more confidence you build the better off you will be in a combat zone.”
Most of the students have only fast-roped from a stationary platform or building. Getting used to a moving machine and unpredictable actions was a change of pace. The exercise was equally beneficial to pilots of HMM-364, also known as the Purple Foxes. They practiced hovering at minimum altitudes to clear obstacles but not so low that their down wash adversely affected the rope or Marines. They unloaded Marines from heights of 10-20 feet to as high as 60 feet.

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Fast roping prepares Marines for rapid ship-to-shore deployment

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